• Cool Boredom Paid Member

    In everyday life, we habitually try to conceal the gaps in our experience of mind and body. These gaps are a bit like an awkward silence around the table at a dinner party. A good host is supposed to keep the conversation going with his or her guests to put them at ease. You might talk about the weather, the latest books you've read, or what you are serving for dinner. We treat ourselves similarly. We occupy ourselves with subconscious chatter because we are uncomfortable with any gaps in our conversation with ourselves. More »
  • 5 Reasons I Haven't Settled on a Buddhist School Paid Member

    What do you look for in a Buddhist tradition? What draws you in and makes you feel like one specific approach is your home? A charismatic teacher? Pragmatic meditation techniques? Elaborate rituals? Fancy man-dresses and sparkly beads? The opportunity to kung fu your enemies? Want to know what I look for? Probably not, but here goes.            I look for perfection. Utter, complete, sublime perfection. For the past 16 years or so I’ve been on an elaborate, grueling search for Buddhism’s immaculate vehicle, the tradition or lineage that will slingshot me to enlightenment without ruffling any of my admittedly messy feathers, the one that suits me to a T. Not too hot. Not too cold. Just right. More »
  • How to Fail Paid Member

    If there is one skill that is not stressed very much, but is really needed, it is knowing how to fail. There is a Samuel Beckett quote that goes “Try again. Fail again. Fail better.” That quote is what will help you more than anything else in the next year, the next ten years, the next twenty years, for as long as you live, until you drop dead. There is a lot of emphasis on succeeding. We all want to succeed, especially if we consider success to be things working out the way we want them to. Failing is what we don't usually get a lot of preparation for. So how to fail? More »
  • Running with the Sakyong Paid Member

    Last week, the New Yorker caught up with Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, leader of Shambhala International, to speak about human integrity, mindfulness, and the benefits of jogging. "When you're running," says Rinpoche, "there's a real sense of bringing your mind into your body and relating to what's happening." It's time to speed up that walking meditation, we guess. More »
  • Tricycle Retreats: Coming Soon! Gaylon Ferguson on Natural Bravery Paid Member

    Thank you to Professor Rita Gross for the incredible month of teachings she offered in her Tricycle Retreat, Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners. As with all Tricycle Retreats, the teachings will remain available on as part of our Wisdom Collection after the retreat is over, so if you haven't joined yet, it's not too late!Beginning September 5th, Gaylon Ferguson, a senior teacher in the Shambhala Buddhist lineage and professor at Naropa University, will be leading a Tricycle Retreat titled Natural Bravery, in which he will discuss fear and fearlessness as a path to awakening. Ferguson introduces these teachings in his piece from our Fall 2011 issue: More »
  • BuddhaFest: Crazy Wisdom starts Monday! Paid Member

    "I wanted the audience to feel like they had met Trungpa," says Crazy Wisdom filmmaker Johanna Demetrakas. "I want people to leave the theater feeling like they had spent an hour and a half in his presence."Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche's presence is legendary. Consider: Allen Ginsberg considered him his guru; Thomas Merton wanted to write a book with him; Pema Chodron was his student and Joni Mitchell wrote a song about him. He inspired a huge Buddhist movement in the West. Crazy Wisdom looks at the "life and times" of this major, if controversial, Buddhist figure. Crazy Wisdom is a long time coming. Demetrakas spent five years researching the film and four more years making it. Many Tricycle Community Members have said that it's the film that they are most excited about in the first Tricycle BuddhaFest Online Film Festival. More »