Poetry

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    McDonald's™ Paid Member

     The Great Way is not difficult for those who have no preferences.—Seng-T'san, the 3rd Patriarch I got a Zen friend eats vegetarian at MacDonald's sometimes. He likes the cheap coffee. He says, "Don't be a snob, Bobby. What difference does it make?" And he gives me a wise Buddhist smile. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    San Francisco Boom Paid Member

    Buzz saws cacophonous mega-hums on west side avenues. Beloveds and I are safe for complicated reasons. Sky beyond our deck still reminds me of late-day Arles. All around. Beyond. Dying in creatively vicious ways.   The screwed out here one kind of huge lewd ringing rising on a bright, dry afternoon.   Barbara Berman is the senior poetry reviewer for The Daily Rumpus. She has work forthcoming in 99 Poems for the 99 Percent, out July from 99:The Press. Image: Amani Willett/Gallery Stock More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    “Massacre” Paid Member

  • In Memory of My Childhood Friend Paid Member

    The wealth of the world is mist on the mountain pass.My closest friends, but guests on market day.Uncertain joys and sorrows are last night’s dream.I think and think; they have no essence. Led by the unknown envoy of Yama [god of death],My friend wanders the long and narrow path to the next life.Sublime refuge, three divine foundations,Please be his compassionate guide. More »
  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Idleness Waiting Grace Paid Member

    Mark C. Taylor recounts a poignant lover affair not with a person but with a place that, paradoxically, cannot be easily localized. For many years, Taylor has lived in the Berkshire Mountains, where he writes and creates land art and sculpture. In a world of mobile screens a virtual realities, where speed is the measure of success and place is disappearing, his work slows down thought and brings life back to earth to give readers time to ponder the importance of place before it slips away. Idleness More »
  • Tricycle Community 7 comments

    Don’t They Know? Paid Member

    On an autumn afternoon, poet Mark Doty arrived at the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care to join its founders, Koshin Paley Ellison and Robert Chodo Campbell, in a conversation spanning grief, loss, attention, aging, and death. Doty has published five volumes of nonfiction prose and eight books of poems, including Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems, which won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. His poems have been widely anthologized and have also appeared in such magazines as The Atlantic Monthly, The London Review of Books, Ploughshares, Poetry, The New Yorker, and, of course, Tricycle. More »