philosophy

  • Six Questions for B. Alan Wallace Paid Member

    The past four centuries have brought an explosion of scientific knowledge and technological know-how. The march of material progress has, however, left many Buddhist practitioners wondering whether Western society’s external transformation has been matched by an internal one, and if so, what role Buddhism can play in promoting a deeper understanding of both the external and internal worlds. Below, B. Alan Wallace, a uniquely interdisciplinary thinker, responds to six questions on this subject. More »
  • Buddhism: Philosophy or Religion? Paid Member

    This article is the fifth in the Tricycle blog series 10 Misconceptions about Buddhism with scholars Robert E. Buswell Jr. and Donald S. Lopez Jr.  More »
  • Nagarjuna Paid Member

    The object of knowledge in dream is not seen when oneawakes. Similarly the world disappears to him who isawakened from the darkness of ignorance.The creation of illusion is nothing but illusion. Wheneverything is compound there is nothing which can beregarded as a real thing. Such is the nature of all things. -Mahayanavimsaka of Nagarjuna via Himalayan Art Resources, More »
  • Are we kidding our selves? Paid Member

    In the January 22nd, 2010 Times Literary Supplement, the philosopher Peter Hacker considers Galen Strawson's book Selves, which at 452 pages seems like a dense and weighty philosophical tome. In his review, Hacker traces the use of the word "self" from its early Middle English origins up to its (problematic, he says) use by John Locke in the famous Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). After this, Hacker writes: "Self" rapidly sprouted definite and indefinite articles, and singular and plural forms. It was conceived to be the subject of experience, the possessor of experience and the core of the identity of the person. Indeed, it was supposedly the reference of the first-person pronoun "I". It was the self, thus conceived, that Hume famously failed to find: "When I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other.... I can never catch myself at any time without a perception, and can never observe anything but a perception." Hume's failure will be familiar to most Buddhists. More »