• Cool Boredom Paid Member

    In everyday life, we habitually try to conceal the gaps in our experience of mind and body. These gaps are a bit like an awkward silence around the table at a dinner party. A good host is supposed to keep the conversation going with his or her guests to put them at ease. You might talk about the weather, the latest books you've read, or what you are serving for dinner. We treat ourselves similarly. We occupy ourselves with subconscious chatter because we are uncomfortable with any gaps in our conversation with ourselves. More »
  • Guided Meditation—Week 4 Paid Member

    Ven. Pannavati has led weekly guided meditations each Monday in March for Meditation Month. Check the blog for the previous installments in this series. Download the transcript of this retreat. It has been edited for clarity.  Ven. Pannavati will respond to reader questions posted below. More »
  • Guided Meditation—Week 3 Paid Member

    Ven. Pannavati is leading weekly guided meditations for Meditation Month. Check back every Monday in March for a new video teaching on the blog.Download the transcript of this retreat. It has been edited for clarity.  Ven. Pannavati will respond to reader questions posted below. More »
  • Contemplate the Body, Free the Mind Paid Member

    When meditators' minds have reached genuine happiness in the dhamma through their mindfulness and discernment, clearly seeing the four noble truths, none of them—not one—will revert to looking for happiness in the world or in material things. That's because happiness in the dhamma is a lasting happiness: solid, refined, and genuinely pure. If you compare worldly happiness with the happiness of the dhamma, you'll see that there's not even the least real happiness to it. It offers nothing but stress, nothing but drawbacks. So why do we think it's happiness? Because we're burning with pain. We look to worldly happiness and pleasures to relieve the pain, which then goes away for a while but then comes back again. More »
  • The School for Compassionate Action Paid Member

    Recently I helped with a video shoot for an upcoming Tricycle Retreat with yoga and meditation teacher Jill Satterfield. Because Jill's teachings—a unique synthesis of yoga and Buddhism—have more of a physical element to them than most of the retreats we've hosted, she had a group of her students join her to engage in the practices and demonstrate restorative yoga poses. It was very inspiring, Jill and her students are clearly a closely bonded group of dedicated practitioners.During the shoot, I was very happy to learn about the The School for Compassionate Action, a non-profit organization which Jill recently founded. The School's mission is to provide "meditation, yoga, and education for communities in need and those who serve them."From, More »