lojong

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    Train Your Mind: Lojong commentary by Judy Lief Paid Member

    For well over a year, Acharya Judy Lief, teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, has been offering weekly commentary on one of Atisha's 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. With this week's entry, Judy has now given teachings on all 59 slogans. We would like to thank Judy for her extensive guidance and for the tremendous knowledge, insight, and diligence she has shown throughout this process. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa's Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche's commentaries on the lojong ("mind-training") teachings. Each entry includes a practice. Preliminary Teachings: More »
  • Acharya Judy Lief on Gratitude Paid Member

    Every Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, a senior teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha’s 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa’s Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche’s commentaries on the lojong teachings. Each entry includes a practice. See the previous slogans and commentaries here. More »
  • Angry, angry, angry Paid Member

    From Teabaggers (I never got used to "Tea Partiers" and stick with the name they gave themselves) to television news shriekers to the average Jane and Joe on the street (employed or not), Americans seem pretty testy lately. Just turn on cable or take public transportation—or read the blogs. Whether it's difficulty adjusting to the realities of the new century or to our much-changed role in the world, people are angry. So I thought I'd link to a short piece by Ken McLeod, who wrote on anger, its causes, and its remedies through mind-training (lojong), a practice Acharya Judy Lief writes about regularly for us at tricycle.com. More »
  • Acharya Judy Lief on Working with Labels and Reactions Paid Member

    Every Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, a senior teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha’s 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa’s Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche’s commentaries on the lojong teachings. Each entry includes a practice. See the previous slogans and commentaries here. 8. Three objects, three poisons, and three seeds of virtue. More »
  • Judy Lief on Absolute and Relative Bodhichitta Paid Member

    We're very lucky to have Acharya Judy Lief writing commentary on the lojong (mind-training) slogans at tricycle.com. As she writes in her introduction to Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche's classic Training the Mind, "Through slogan practice, we begin to realize that our habitual tendency, even in our smallest gestures, is one of self-centeredness." She also writes that the slogans "form a loop in which nothing is excluded." The playful and sometimes ironic tone of the slogans should not fool us: Lojong is a complete path of practice all on its own. She has a new post up today discussing absolute and relative bodhichitta, in which she writes: More »
  • Be a child of illusion Paid Member

    Each Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha's 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Following each commentary Judy offers us a weekly practice. Here is Slogan 6 (each slogan provides links to the previous slogans, including a two-part discussion of their history and use in practice). I've been following along each week myself—a good way to stay grounded—rather ungrounded!—in my practice. 6. In postmeditation, be a child of illusion. Practice can be divided into two: meditation and postmeditation. More »