India

  • Ths Cost of Going Green Paid Member

    An appeal is made to the E.U. to slow down on using biofuels, which can be worse for the earth per gallon than fossil fuels. But on the other hand it's a little frightening that India (along with many other countries) is building huge coal-burning plants as fast as they can. As Andrew Revkin writes: The decision [to build the coal-burning plants] powerfully illustrates one of the most inconvenient facets of the world’s intertwined climate and energy challenges — that more than two billion people still lack any viable energy choices, let alone green ones. More »
  • Honored Guest or Pain in the Neck? Paid Member

    India weighs its relationship with the Dalai Lama. More »
  • 8 killed in Kardze Paid Member

    Police fired on monks and civilians in Kardze in eastern Tibet, killing eight. Radio Free Asia has a lot of info on this. The monks objected to a re-education program they were forced to undergo, and the government objected to their objections. Some sources say as many as fifteen were killed, and there are also reports of at least two monks in Sichuan province committing suicide: On Saturday, the Tibetan Center for Human Rights and Democracy, based in India, said two monks committed suicide last month in Sichuan's Aba County following government oppression. More »
  • Tricycle Pilgrimage to India, January 2008 Paid Member

    The Tricycle pilgrimage to India was an eventful one, with so many sites visited we were all a bit winded by the end of it. This year, our unflappable Indian guide, Shantum Seth, took us down to the stone-temple caves of Ajanta and Ellora--truly spectacular. Stephen Batchelor and Shantum led mediations and teachings, and most memorable for me--after Ajanta and Ellora--was our visit to Sanchi, in Madhaya Pradesh. Sanchi is the site of some of the most well-preserved stupas and examples of Buddhist architecture. Stone structures spanning centuries are perched high on a hill overlooking the plains below. The great thing about Sanchi is that it spans a period from the third to the twelfth centuries. The earliest structures show no representation of the Buddha at all, in keeping with the tradition's focus on the teachings, not the man. More »