food

  • 5 Day Buddhist Monk Diet? It works. Paid Member

    Here's what we read at Environmental Health News: People who adopted a vegetarian diet for just five days show reduced levels of toxic chemicals in their bodies. In particular, levels of hormone disrupting chemicals and antibiotics used in livestock were lower after the five-day vegetarian program. The pilot study suggests that people may be able reduce their exposure to potentially dangerous chemicals through dietary choices, such as limiting consumption of animal products like meats and dairy. And whose diet did they follow? Twenty-five participants lived in a Buddhist temple and adopted the monks' lifestyle – including their traditional vegetarian diet – for five days. More »
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    Hunger Paid Member

    Hunger is on the rise across the globe as food prices rise out of reach of the poorest families. With the sinking economy, with climate change, with war  -- the poor are always the most vulnerable. More »
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    World Food Crisis; Street Zen Paid Member

    The world food crisis: Scientists and economists worry that the reallocation of scarce water resources — away from rice and other grains and toward more lucrative crops and livestock — threatens poor countries that import rice as a dietary staple. More »
  • Nepal's Election; World Food Crisis; How to Cook Your Life Paid Member

    Nepal's election is here, but it may be dangerous to vote. Manjushree Thapa writes: Democracy may be imperfect, but unlike absolute systems like Maoism and monarchism, it incorporates mechanisms to correct its own flaws. So, yes: I am planning to risk my life to vote today. Not that the election will resolve much. Most Nepalis recognize that it will, in fact, send our country into an era of heightened instability. Plus the world's growing food crisis, and how biofuels are at least somewhat to blame. And speaking of food, I recently watched the first half of "How to Cook Your Life", a movie about Edward Espe Brown, the author of The Tassajara Bread Book, teaching people to make bread as part of their Zen practice. More »