Chogyam Trungpa

  • Acharya Judy Lief on Working with Labels and Reactions Paid Member

    Every Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, a senior teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha’s 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa’s Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche’s commentaries on the lojong teachings. Each entry includes a practice. See the previous slogans and commentaries here. 8. Three objects, three poisons, and three seeds of virtue. More »
  • Dharma/Arte: Trungpa inspired Brazil based arts community Paid Member

    “Genuine art reveals the truth.” -Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche “Mata-mor”, by Rodrigo Bueno Recently Tricycle asked our online supporters to recommend to us Buddhist charities and non-profits that are doing good work around the world. Among the many responses we received, there were several very enthusiastic endorsements of the group Dharma/Arte, a highly respected non-profit institution that promotes activities in the areas art and education. More »
  • Oxherding in the Korea Times Paid Member

    Things have been tense on the Korean Peninsula lately, with crowds in Seoul today calling for revenge against the north for the sinking of the Cheonan, a South Korean naval vessel. But readers of the Korean Times awoke this morning to the 10 Oxherding Pictures, the classic Zen (in Korean, Soen) series that depicts the practitioner's progress toward enlightenment—a nice antidote to the recent hostilities, or a least a welcome if momentary reprieve. More »
  • "The Discovery of Egolessness" by David Nichtern Paid Member

    Via the Huffington Post, "The entire Buddhist path is based on the discovery of egolessness and the maturing of insightor knowledge that comes from egolessness." --- Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche / Journey Without Goal I have heard many times from students and spiritual practitioners of all kinds, shapes and sizes, that if they could only "get rid of their ego," then they could have some peace and taste enlightenment. There are also many "self-help" teachings and gurus who are promoting techniques to "strengthen" the ego -- to ripen and develop one's sense of power, accomplishment and tangible assets -- make you skinnier, more assertive, richer, happier, etc. etc. etc. But the approaches of getting rid of OR strengthening the ego may both share a similar delusion: that it actually exists in some solid and fixed way in the first place. More »