• English Translation of the Dalai Lama/Chinese Citizens Twitter Talk Paid Member

    The New York Review of Books posted the May 21 Twitter conversation between the Dalai Lama and Chinese citizens in its entirety. Perry Link translated the dialogue and explains how such an event was able to take place. So how did Wang Lixiong do it? First he asked representatives of the Dalai Lama, who is on a tour of the U.S., for an hour of time in which the Tibetan religious leader might answer questions from Chinese citizens. The Dalai Lama agreed to use the hour of 8 to 9 a.m. (EST) on May 21 for this purpose. Wang then arranged to open a Twitter page beginning on May 17 at 10:30 a.m. (Beijing time), onto which Chinese Web users could pose questions. More »
  • China plans world's largest dam on Tibet's last great undammed river Paid Member

    Chinese engineers recently proposed a plan for the world's largest hydroelectric dam on the Tsangpo-Brahmaputra, considered Tibet's last great undammed river. Tibet's river systems water much of China itself, as well as south and southeast Asia, and India has raised concerns that Beijing will try and divert water away from south Asia, but this concern is probably far-fetched. More »
  • Want to go to China for free? Paid Member

    ...Then follow Himalayan Art Resource's director Jeff Watt as he blogs his way through the Middle Kingdom! Read his daily reports from China's museums, universities and Buddhist temples. From his April 3rd blog post, Yesterday morning we left early to travel to the Dazu Grotto. The Sichuan University provided a car and driver for our use. The grottoes are about 300 kilometers north of Chengdu. Dazu is the name of the city/town closest to the different stone carving grotto sites. Dazu means big foot, or big feet. The plural is not made clear in Chinese for this place name. We ate lunch in the town prior to going to the site which I later learned was actually multiple sites. More »
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    Tibet-China Conflict Featured in this Week's The Economist Paid Member

    The Economist has published a lengthy report on the mass uprisings in Tibet earlier this year. The article is written from magazine's signature centrist point of view, and takes a relatively non-judgmental stance. The most interesting part is the author's musings on China's response to the riots in March. In a perplexing course of action, China did not react to the initial unrest with their usual level of brutal efficiency (several people were still killed). As a result, the chaos was allowed to spread far further than it may have otherwise. The article then goes on to offer cynical speculation on the motives of the Chinese government for their actions at the time(an excuse for the later wide-scale clampdown of the region, or caution leading up to the Olympics?), and then, the motives of all involved parties in general. More »
  • Recent news from the China-Tibet Drama Paid Member

    Drama: No other word quite encapsulates recent happenings so well. It's only barely an irreverent choice of words, considering the almost comical amount of nothing changing. First off, belated, but... Happy Birthday, His Holiness the Dalai Lama! Apparently, that is about as exuberant as the actual celebrations were. "Tibetans all over the world will be praying today for the long life of the Dalai Lama. But as the situation in Tibet continues to be bad, we have decided to not hold any cultural song and dance event to mark the event," -Thupten Samphel, spokesman of the exiled government. More »