China

  • Waiting out the Dalai Lama may be China's big mistake Paid Member

    Waiting out the Dalai Lama may be a big mistake for China. Dealing with him now may be easier than what may follow in his wake. Lodi Gyari, the Dalai Lama's representative in Washington, writes this in the South China Morning Post, quoted yesterday in a blog post by New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof: More »
  • Green China? It's complicated... Paid Member

    "China provides a free environment for architects. We're not impeded by the complicated regional planning and bureaucratic red tape. Most importantly, China has great craftsmen who can help me visualize my architectural concepts." That's how American architect David Greenberg sees it, whose work for the past 12 years in China has been heavily influenced by his Zen practice. Greenberg was introduced to Zen in Hawaii by a Chinese master, who also suggested he learn the Tao. A recent work of Greenberg's is a treehouse "eco resort," overlooking the South China Sea, at the Nanshan Buddhist Culture Zone, Sanya, Hainan province. Greenberg is no fan of the Western-style buildings springing up across Chinese cities like mushrooms. As he tells xinhuanet.com: More »
  • Chinese Communist Party seeks to intensify reforms in Tibetan monasteries Paid Member

    VIA Phayul.com, Dharamsala, August 17: In what appeared to be a fresh effort to further tighten government’s control on Tibet's influential religious institutions, a top leader of the Communist Party of China has called for reforms in Buddhist monasteries by appointing monks and nuns who are "politically reliable". In a move that could be seen as part of Chinese Communist regime’s larger campaign to weed out pro-Dalai Lama elements in the Buddhist clergy, Du Qinglin, head of the United Front Work Department of the Party's Central Committee - the body tasked specifically to handle the Tibet talks - said greater efforts must be made to implement “democratic management in Tibetan Buddhist monasteries.” More »
  • Tibetan writer called to trial Paid Member

    A forty-seven-year-old Tibetan writer, accused of "splittism," will stand trial next month in Xining, the provincial capital of Qinghai Province on the Tibetan Plateau. Splittism is a charge most Tibetan critics of Chinese rule face when arrested. The writer, Tragyal, who writes under the name Shogdung, was arrested following the publication of The Line Between Sky and Earth, which, according to the New York Times, is a "painstakingly written indictment of Chinese rule and a call for a 'peaceful revolution' against what Mr. Tragyal describes as Beijing’s heavy-handed governing style." More »
  • No Dalai Lama iPhone apps in China iTunes store Paid Member

    Looking for a Dalai Lama app in China? You're not going to find it. The Chinese government's obsessive aversion to the Dalai Lama, whom it considers a "splittist" and a “devil with a human face," has now hit iTunes stores: According to Wringer World, Apple has barred access to Dalai Lama apps in China: At least five iPhone apps related to the Dalai Lama are unavailable in the China store. Some of those apps — named Dalai Quotes, Dalai Lama Quotes and Dalai Lama Prayerwheel — display inspirational quotes from the Tibetan spiritual leader. Another, Paging Dalai Lama, tells users where he is currently teaching. A fifth app, Nobel Laureates, contains information about Nobel Prize winners including the Dalai Lama. More »
  • China's pollution worsens, prominent Tibetan conservationist arrested Paid Member

    Four years ago, China overtook the US to become the world's biggest emitter of carbon dioxide. Now International Energy Agency (IEA) has announced that China tops the list as the biggest energy consumer in the world. What does all this mean? Lots and lots of pollution. A report in yesterday's New York Times painted a dispiriting portrait of China's environmental problems: More »