aung san suu kyi

  • Myanmar Buddhists’ Beef Paid Member

    Last year a Muslim businessman called Lwin Tun set up a factory in Labutta, a town in Myanmar's Ayeyarwady Delta. He spent $330,000 on buildings and cooling systems, but couldn't buy the product his factory was meant to process: meat. That's because Labutta's seven cattle slaughterhouses, also Muslim-owned, had suddenly gone out of business. In January 2014 they had tried to renew their licenses, but local authorities had already sold them to an association led by members of the radical Buddhist group Ma Ba Tha. The Muslim slaughterhouses went bust—and so, after just three months, did Lwin Tun's meat-processing factory. More »
  • On Martyrs' Day, Burma's Past Meets its Future Paid Member

    Today marks Burma's Martyrs’ Day, a holiday commemorating the anniversary of the assassination of anti-imperialist revolutionary Aung San, father of the Nobel Peace Prize laureate and newest member of Burmese parliament Aung San Suu Kyi. Recognized as the architect of Burma’s independence from Britain, the young leader was gunned down in a government building on July 19, 1947 along with six of his cabinet ministers, just six months before his country would achieve independence. In Burma, today is a day of mourning, both of the leader and the principles that would have likely become manifest in Burmese society if his life had not been cut short. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Marijuana-filled Buddhas, HHDL speak out on Burma, and some good ol' Buddhist Americana Paid Member

    Earlier this week US Customs and Border Protection officials seized nearly 600 lbs of pot inside a shipment of Buddha statues and other religious figurines. Officials at the El Paso US-Mexico crossing discovered the narcotics—and an alternate explanation for the Buddha's contented grin—with the help of an irreverent, drug-sniffing dog. No arrests have been made. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Sex Tape and the Sangha Paid Member

    In Lowell, Massachusetts, a sex-tape scandal involves neither unscrupulous celebrities nor hapless victims of disgruntled exes, but a Buddhist temple, a monk, and a community organizer with some shady finances. The city's Cambodian community has been rocked by the recording of prominent community leader Maya Men having sex with a monk—in a temple. Both Men and the monk, Ven. Nhem Kimteng, were part of an executive committee responsible for fundraising and overseeing the construction of a new $10 million temple, thus involving the area's sizable Cambodian community, which settled in Lowell in the 1970s following the Khmer Rouge-led genocide in Cambodia. The committee was already mired in controversy with accusations of suspicious finances and a lack of transparency. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: The Mindful Lifestyle Movement and "Insta-Karma" Paid Member

    Over at Maclean's Anne Kingston surveys the world of corporate mindfulness and the Buddhist reaction. "What has gripped Western attention," writes Kingston, "is mindfulness's ability to improve performance—of Olympic athletes, parents, and even nations, as promised in U.S. Congressman Tim Ryan’s 2012 bestseller, Mindful Nation." Mindfulness: the panacea to all our personal and societal ills. Tech entrepreneurs, corporations (benevolent and evil), publishers (Buddhist and non-Buddhist), and life-coaches of all stripes have been quick to capitalize on the "mindful" vogue. More »
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    Aung San Suu Kyi Freed Paid Member

    People around the world have been celebrating today's release of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest. A Nobel Peace Prize winner and practicing Theravada Buddhist, Aung San Suu Kyi was elected Prime Minister of Burma/Myanmar in 1990 but has been detained by Myanmar's military government for around fifteen of the twenty plus years since. For further reading: "Burma releases pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi" -BBC  "Burmese Dissident Is Freed After Long Detention" -New York Times  "Daw Aung San Suu Kyi Released, Her Safety and Possible Re-arrest Major Concerns, Over 2,200 Political Prisoners still Remain in Prisons" -U.S. Campaign for Burma.    Image: ©Shepard Fairey More »