anger

  • The (Justifiably) Angry Marxist Paid Member

    In April 2006, the Japanese cultural anthropologist Noriyuki Ueda met the Dalai Lama for two days of conversation in Dharmasala, India. The discussion, recently translated from the Japanese text, covers such topics as the usefulness of anger, the role of compassion in society, and social and economic justice. "I believe that Buddhism has a big role to play in the world today," Ueda tells His Holiness, "and I am impatient because Buddhists don't seem to realize that." In this interview, Ueda offers us a rare peek into the the political and economic mind of one of the world's most famous spiritual leaders. More »
  • How To Relate to Anger Paid Member

    Sharon Salzberg, from the second talk, "The Five Hindrances: Desire and Aversion," of her Tricycle Retreat: When we step back and re-vision our understanding of life then we don't need to get so lost in our anger. When we look at anger as it arises, what's important is to look at the very feeling, flavor, and texture of anger. We don't say, "This is wrong," "This is bad," "I shouldn't have this anger." Just pay attention to the feeling. More »
  • Fear and Anger are the Same Mind State Paid Member

    Sharon Salzberg, from the week 2 talk of her Tricycle Retreat, "The Five Hindrances: Desire and Aversion" Aversion in Buddhist psychology is quite interesting, because it's both anger and fear. Anger and fear are considered in many ways to be the same mind state, just in different forms. Anger is the outflowing, expressive energized form and fear is the held in, frozen, imploding form. More »
  • Angry, angry, angry Paid Member

    From Teabaggers (I never got used to "Tea Partiers" and stick with the name they gave themselves) to television news shriekers to the average Jane and Joe on the street (employed or not), Americans seem pretty testy lately. Just turn on cable or take public transportation—or read the blogs. Whether it's difficulty adjusting to the realities of the new century or to our much-changed role in the world, people are angry. So I thought I'd link to a short piece by Ken McLeod, who wrote on anger, its causes, and its remedies through mind-training (lojong), a practice Acharya Judy Lief writes about regularly for us at tricycle.com. More »
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    If you’re angry and you know it… Paid Member

    I attended a meeting at the Japan Society recently with some other Tricycle staff members, and several people who work at the fine organization on Manhattan’s east side, to talk about potential future collaboration. While in discussions, one of the staff members at Japan Society said, “Well I know I shouldn’t be angry, but...” and someone there replied, “It’s ok to be angry.” The two distinct notions presented raised the obvious question. Is it ok to be angry? “Many Buddhists get very skilled at pushing anger away, at sitting at a distance from their anger, but it’s not extinguished. They need help bringing it back into the center of their awareness and owning it again,” Psychotherapist and author Mark Epstein shares his views about anger in an interview from the summer 1998 issue of Tricycle. More »