Vipassana

  • Real Happiness 28-Day Meditation Challenge, Day 1 Paid Member

    Today is the first day of Sharon Salzberg's 28-day meditation challenge based on her book Real Happiness. You can get an e-book to begin reading instantly if you join the Tricycle Community now and take advantage of our special offer with Workman Press, the publisher of Real Happiness. Then stop by the Tricycle Book Club to discuss the book with Sharon and others, from now through March 4th. The discussion is already lively there, and the Book Club—rather than here—is the best place to share your own thoughts about this challenge. More »
  • If you can breathe, you can meditate... Paid Member

    That's the subtitle of the first chapter of Sharon Salzberg's Real Happiness: The Power of Meditation. Here at Tricycle we've begun the countdown: 5 days until we begin the four-week Meditation Challenge. For details, see yesterday's post. And by way of introduction to Real Happiness, the consummate meditation guide that will serve as our North Star throughout the 28-day meditation period, here's a taste: What is Meditation? Straightforward and simple (but not easy), meditatoin is essentially training our attention so that we can be more aware—not only of our own inner workings but also of what's happening around us in the here and now. Once we see clearly what's going on in the moment, we can then choose whether and how to act on what we're seeing. More »
  • It's Back: The 28 Day Meditation Challenge! Paid Member

    Last week I joined Sharon Salzberg and 30 or so others at Tibet House in New York City to prepare for a 28-day meditation challenge that begins on February 1. Participants will run the gamut, from a fireman to an investment banker to a TV producer, from beginners to old pros. Sharon gave initial instruction and plenty of encouragement, especially to those who are new to meditation practice. More »
  • Joseph Goldstein at InsightLA tomorrow Paid Member

    A while back I spoke to Vipassana teacher Joseph Goldstein about his event at InsightLA, which takes place tomorrow. A few years back Joseph was generous enough to answer reader questions about practice and had this to say about "what to do with our minds during vispassana practice": More »
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    Joseph Goldstein at InsightLA, January 4th Paid Member

    This afternoon I spoke with Vipassana teacher Joseph Goldstein today about his upcoming event at InsightLA, the difficulties of this "most wonderful time of the year" (December Dukkha) and more. We'll have the audio up on the site soon. In the meantime, if you're in southern California in the new Year, be sure to check out his InsightLA event. A few years back, several teachers volunteered their time and wisdom to answer questions from Tricycle readers. Joseph Goldstein was among them. In one of his answers he expressed this thought:More »
  • Urgency in Burma Paid Member

    Our friend Allan Badiner sends along the following, a guest blogpost from a campaigner for the US Campaign for Burma named Patrick Cook-Deegan.   Each day for the past seven years, Burma’s imprisoned Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi started her morning by practicing meditation alone in her dilapidated house in Rangoon. But last month, Suu Kyi’s schedule changed markedly when she was freed from house arrest after seven and a half continuous years of detention. As she walked out to the gate of her home, she smiled at the thousands of followers who had flocked to her house to show their support. As she addressed them, she promised to continue Burma’s “non-violent revolution.”For Free Burma campaigners like myself, it brought tears to our eyes to see “The Lady” back where she belongs: amidst the people of Burma. Usually even the roads to reach her house are blocked by soldiers—I witnessed that first-hand this past summer in Rangoon. In fact, this is the first time I have seen Suu Kyi free since becoming a part of the Burma solidarity movement four years ago.I first got involved in Burma after going on a solo bicycle trip 1,000 miles through the country in the summer of 2006. During my month long trip, I was frequently followed by Burma’s military police, and I played the good tourist most of the time to prevent endangering the locals around me. But there were times I could slip away from my followers and find Burmese people who were willing to tell me about their lives. Often I ended up at monasteries talking with monks. Many of Burma’s younger monks are politically active and eager to talk to foreigners. In Mandalay, I spent a few days befriending one young monk named U Zwingar. We were about the same age—21—and we shared many of the same values. I had just completed my first 10-day mediation sit and I was interested in learning more about Buddhism. And we were both interested in politics. More »