Tricycle

  • Buddhist Charities Paid Member

    In our Spring 2010 issue, which contained a special section on Generosity (and Greed), we included spread on Buddhist or Buddhism-related charities and not-for-profits that are doing good work around the world.  We did a second installment for the Summer 2010 issue and are currently working on a third for the August issue. While we are close to complete, we are still open to suggestions. More »
  • Tricycle responds to Elephant Journal columnist Paid Member

    A short while ago, in an attempt to streamline the flood of information coming to us via Twitter, one of our team reduced the number of feeds we follow from something like 380 to around 60. No harm was meant (indeed, some have declared it "weird" to be followed by a magazine) and we apologize to those we offended. There are many, many Buddhists on Twitter and we actually do read our feed. More »
  • Tricycle Community 37 comments

    Share your thoughts on the Fifth Precept Paid Member

    For the forthcoming issue of Tricycle we're putting together a special section on the fifth precept--refraining from taking intoxicants--and we would love to hear your thoughts. Perspectives on the fifth precept vary a great deal--from those who refrain from any and all drugs and alcohol, to those who interpret the term "intoxicants" more loosely and use psychedelics as part of their Buddhist practice. Where do you fall on this spectrum? Send your comments, questions, stories, and opinions to editorial@tricycle.com or reply directly to this post. Who knows, your answer might end up in next issue's special section! More »
  • Brazilian military police go Zen Paid Member

    If you've seen Pixote (or read newspapers), you probably don't hold Carioca policemen in high regard. But try Espirito Santo, a state in Brazil's southeast, where military police "are developing interpersonal relationship skills, emotional balance and discipline in a Zen Buddhist monastery." You can read more here. If you read Portuguese, you can see it in Globo. And if you don't, you can still watch the video there. More »
  • Contemporary Tibetan Art at the Rubin Paid Member

    Over at Jeff's Travel's we read: Pema Rinzin is one of the only Tibetan artists that I know who has trained in the traditional way of "tangka" and mural painting and that has also successfully transitioned into contemporary painting while still creating and teaching the so-called traditional art. Jeff, ever emphasizing the importance of Buddhism's visual culture (apparently, we don't publish enough of it), let's us know that a show featuring Pema's and other contemporary Tibetan painters' work will be opening at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City on June 11. You can find more of Jeff's thoughts on Pema's work here. But don't expect a lot of theory. As Jeff writes: More »
  • Who discovered tea? Paid Member

    Was it Bodhidharma (the Indians and Zen Buddhists think so) or Emperor Shen Nung (all of China thinks so) who discovered tea? The emperor found that it kept his soldiers alert, while Bodhidharma, marathon meditator that he was, discovered that it helped keep him awake in meditation (in his commitment to stay awake, Bodhidharma severed his eyelids, from which sprang forth the first tea plant). You decide whose uses are most noble. So who was it? It'll depend on where you are when you ask—in other words, there is no answer—but there are good and reliable tips for everything from choosing the right tea to brewing a cup to cleaning your teapot. More »