Tricycle

  • A Day at the Grist Mill with Bonnie Myotai Treace Paid Member

    Yesterday I was lucky enough to get out of my cave cubicle in the Tricycle office and travel to Garrison, New York to the Grist Mill, where Bonnie Myotai Treace leads retreats for the Hermitage Heart sangha. Garrison is a 90-minute train ride straight up the Hudson River from New York City. The Grist Mill, pictured below from across the mill pond, is within easy walking distance of the train station. The Hudson Valley is so beautiful it seems odd that is so close to the city. In the morning when I woke up in Brooklyn it was warm and sticky, the air heavy and still. In Garrison it was cool, breezy and clear. I was there with videographer and friend of Tricycle Denise Petrizzo. Our mission was to film the first part of a teaching by Myotai that will appear on Tricycle.com in July as our Tricycle Retreat, "Whole Life Offering." Arriving early Tuesday morning, Denise and I walked around the mill, which is tucked into a deep green wood full of streams, ponds, and small rocky waterfalls. A few feet into the woods at the beginning of our walk, we startled two fawns and were too slow to catch them on camera. Stupidly I didn't take any photos. When you have a video camera to worry about, sometimes you slip on the small stuff like still photography. Myotai later told us a story about the late John Daido Loori Roshi, who was famous for his love of photography and fostering creativity in his students. He would send his photography students out on long walks by Zen Mountain Monastery and tell them to take just one picture! They must have come back having seen so much more, searching the landscape intently for that one perfect shot! Daido's birthday was June 14th. (Two pieces by Myotai appeared in the Spring 2010 Tricycle: "The Sword Disappears in the Water," and a remembrance of Daido, "Being Love by Loving.") More »
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    Open Focus with Philippe Petite, Man on Wire Paid Member

    On Monday night, a few of us from Tricycle headed over to the Rubin Museum to attend an interview with high wire walker Philippe Petit, conducted by photographer Tom Wool. Wool's photographs of Tibet's Rongbuk Valley are being shown at the Rubin in an exhibit entitled "In the Shadow of Everest." The photos are breathtaking portraits of a remote part of the world---portraits of young school boys, Buddhist nuns and monks meditating, and the contents of his guide's pocket which included a half-dozen photos of the Dalai Lama, an image forbidden in the area. More »
  • Wrong, wrong, wrong! Paid Member

    Himalayan Art Resources' Jeff Watt couldn't be more emphatic: Art for art's sake is as old as Tibet—in fact, far older. So you can imagine how ticked off the Tibetan iconography expert was when he read this at artdaily.org: There is no Tibetan equivalent for the word “art” as it is known in the West. The closest approximation is lha dri pa, literally, “to draw a deity.” Traditionally, neither the Tibetan language nor the Tibetan cultural framework has recognized art for art’s sake, and an artist’s efficacy rests in his ability to precisely replicate an established visual language and portray the essence of a particular deity. (Artdaily.org). More »
  • Buddhism for Humanists Paid Member

    Over at The New Humanism (TNH), a publication of the Humanist Chaplaincy at Harvard, there is a special issue dedicated to Secular Buddhism, featuring, among others—and not surprisingly—Tricycle contributing editor Stephen Batchelor, author of the recently published Confession of a Buddhist Atheist. In "No Future in a Parrot's Egg: Digging into the Humanist Heart of Buddhism" Batchelor writes, More »
  • Paul McCartney's little Buddha Paid Member

    Legendary Beatle and committed vegetarian Paul McCartney acknowledges that he travels with a portable Buddha statue on hand: ‘I think candles started it and then somebody brought in a little Buddha. So then we suddenly got this," he said, according to Britain's Daily Mail. In 2008, McCartney caused a bit of a Buddhist stir when he took issue with the Dalai Lama's meat-eating: ...I found out he was not a vegetarian, so I wrote to him saying, "Forgive me for pointing this out, but if you eat animals then there is some suffering somewhere along the line." More »