Tricycle

  • Cool Tibetan tattoos, the challenges of displaying religious art, and a nice life Paid Member

    Jeff Watt over at Jeff's Travels points us to Yoni Zilber's Tibetan-themed tattoos. It's one way to view Tibetan art, and another is to visit the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of Art in the nation's capital ("In the Realm of the Buddha," through July 18). I've often talked to Jeff about the role of art in Buddhism and he has often complained that stripped of its connection to practice, religious objects are rendered pretty meaningless. More »
  • Nalanda Benefit Paid Member

    If you’re in the neighborhood Wednesday evening (June 9)—and the interface of Buddhism and psychotherapy is your thing—Nalanda Institute for Contemplative Science is hosting a panel discussion, “The Confluence of Two Streams: Buddhist Psychotherapy in the West,” at Tibet House in New York City. Participating are Nalanda’s founder and director, psychiatrist Joe Loizzo, and two other big names in the field, Paul Fulton, PhD, president of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy, and psychoanalyst Jeffrey Rubin, PhD, author of Psychotherapy and Buddhism. The conversation should be lively: moderating is Robert Thurman, the charismatic Columbia professor and president of Tibet House US. More »
  • Martine Batchelor's Tricycle Retreat Begins Today: Breaking Bad Habits Paid Member

    Each of the Tricycle Retreats has its own flavor. Martine Batchelor's is probably the most personable—we even get to meet her cat and have a look at the view from here terrace at her home in South of France—red-tile roofs as far as the eye can see (Martine and husband, Stephen, live just outside Bordeaux). All this before we settle in to a clear and accessible teaching on the fundamentals of meditation. What I especially like is that Martine begins with the basics—always a great way to open a retreat. Later, she'll explain how the type of meditation she teaches can work to change our habits at a fundamental level. You can check out the first teaching for free here. More »
  • Do Less & Accomplish More Paid Member

    I'm sure multitasking has made me dumber and the NYT's lead this morning just confirmed my suspicions. But if Anna's post below disheartens you, here's the antidote: Marc Lesser's "Do Less & Accomplish More." Lesser offers step-by-step practical advice for making the most of your time. My own tip: Consider turning off TweetDeck, and let me know if you do: I haven't managed to pull the plug on it yet. More »
  • "The Buddha's actually right here..." Paid Member

    Here's Reggie Ray on Facebook: You read these books on Tibetan Buddhism, and it’s very 
complicated. Has anyone read any
 of those books? They’re very 
complicated. There are a lot of
 stages and paths and different levels, and sometimes you become completely
...confused. Eventually you begin to 
feel that the Buddha’s way up there you can barely see the top of the ladder—and it’s very important to remember that actually that’s a metaphor, and the Buddha’s actually right here. The closer we come to our own heart, the more we have gone through what they’re talking about. More »
  • 5 Day Buddhist Monk Diet? It works. Paid Member

    Here's what we read at Environmental Health News: People who adopted a vegetarian diet for just five days show reduced levels of toxic chemicals in their bodies. In particular, levels of hormone disrupting chemicals and antibiotics used in livestock were lower after the five-day vegetarian program. The pilot study suggests that people may be able reduce their exposure to potentially dangerous chemicals through dietary choices, such as limiting consumption of animal products like meats and dairy. And whose diet did they follow? Twenty-five participants lived in a Buddhist temple and adopted the monks' lifestyle – including their traditional vegetarian diet – for five days. More »