Tricycle

  • On disagreeing with the Dalai Lama Paid Member

    A few posts back I cited an AFP article in which the Dalai Lama, in advocating nonviolence, appeared to criticize the Sea Shepherds, a group of anti-whaling activists who have been much in the news lately. After the AFP article appeared, Sea Shepherd Conservation Society president Captain Paul Watson responded on the organization’s website, reiterating his group’s commitment to nonviolence while acknowledging the Dalai Lama’s past and present support:: More »
  • Things to consider as your parents age Paid Member

    Tricycle contributing editor Katy Butler recently interviewed Jeff Bridges for our upcoming August issue, and, as frequent visitors to our site know by now, you can watch Jeff and Bernie Glassman shooting the breeze in our two-part online interview. More »
  • Self-mummifying meditator Paid Member

    Wisdom Quarterly points us to a YouTube video featuring Tibetan tumo practitioners drying wet sheets on their bare bodies in cool temperatures. All the while a Harvard professor discusses the wonders of meditation, tumo practice—a  technique through which meditators raise the surface temperature of their skin—being just one of them. More »
  • Acharya Judy Lief on Working with Labels and Reactions Paid Member

    Every Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, a senior teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha’s 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa’s Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche’s commentaries on the lojong teachings. Each entry includes a practice. See the previous slogans and commentaries here. 8. Three objects, three poisons, and three seeds of virtue. More »
  • A Day at the Grist Mill with Bonnie Myotai Treace Paid Member

    Yesterday I was lucky enough to get out of my cave cubicle in the Tricycle office and travel to Garrison, New York to the Grist Mill, where Bonnie Myotai Treace leads retreats for the Hermitage Heart sangha. Garrison is a 90-minute train ride straight up the Hudson River from New York City. The Grist Mill, pictured below from across the mill pond, is within easy walking distance of the train station. The Hudson Valley is so beautiful it seems odd that is so close to the city. In the morning when I woke up in Brooklyn it was warm and sticky, the air heavy and still. In Garrison it was cool, breezy and clear. I was there with videographer and friend of Tricycle Denise Petrizzo. Our mission was to film the first part of a teaching by Myotai that will appear on Tricycle.com in July as our Tricycle Retreat, "Whole Life Offering." Arriving early Tuesday morning, Denise and I walked around the mill, which is tucked into a deep green wood full of streams, ponds, and small rocky waterfalls. A few feet into the woods at the beginning of our walk, we startled two fawns and were too slow to catch them on camera. Stupidly I didn't take any photos. When you have a video camera to worry about, sometimes you slip on the small stuff like still photography. Myotai later told us a story about the late John Daido Loori Roshi, who was famous for his love of photography and fostering creativity in his students. He would send his photography students out on long walks by Zen Mountain Monastery and tell them to take just one picture! They must have come back having seen so much more, searching the landscape intently for that one perfect shot! Daido's birthday was June 14th. (Two pieces by Myotai appeared in the Spring 2010 Tricycle: "The Sword Disappears in the Water," and a remembrance of Daido, "Being Love by Loving.") More »