Tricycle

  • Religious disharmony in India, in spite of what you may have heard Paid Member

    It must have been music to Indian ears to hear the Dalai Lama suggest earlier this month that China learn nonviolence and religious harmony from India. But it was just so much noise to others. India, after all, has been witness to some of the most extreme religious and inter-caste violence in the post-war period. We read this from Andrew Suttaford over at the Secular Right: More »
  • Gender equality gets a black eye, Jeff Bridges & the Dalai Lama Paid Member

    Amanda Brown at The Anti-Room isn't too happy with the Dalai Lama's follow-up to his own comment that his next incarnation could very well be female. I'd heard the first comment but not the second she cites (I'm usually better at staying on top of these things but have been quite slow on this one). Here's Amanda: Buddhism has long been held as being the acceptable religion by many left leaning liberals, who would also count themselves in favour of gender equality. It is therefore a bit depressing to note the Dalai Lama’s recent comments about the possibility of a woman succeeding him. He begins well enough. More »
  • Right attitude Paid Member

    Shinno Yamasoba, 58, is the vice head priest at Daijyo-ji, an an 8th-century Shingon temple three hours outside Kyoto by train. In the Japan Times, he shares some monkish wisdom with Japanese TV reporter Judit Kawaguchiwho: "We'll know if the road was correct when we arrive," Yamasoba says, "That's how we Buddhists think. But since a monk's road is never straight, the trip is always fun. It really doesn't matter where I'm going." More »
  • 5 recent quotes from Thich Nhat Hanh in today's Guardian Paid Member

    In the current issue of Tricycle, contributing editor Andrew Cooper recounts his travels with Thich Nhat Hanh, the much beloved Vietnamese teacher, poet, peace advocate and environmentalist. Cooper's view is unique; charged with attending Thay, as he is called, on an early visit to the United States, Cooper offers an up-close-and-personal view of a man who changed—in fact, helped to shape—Buddhism in the West. Today's Guardian features a nice piece on Thay on the occasion of his visit to Nottingham, where he led nearly 1,000 people in walking meditation (above). Here are five outtakes: 1. "The situation the Earth is in today has been created by unmindful production and unmindful consumption. We consume to forget our worries and our anxieties. Tranquilizing ourselves with over-consumption is not the way." More »
  • This Buddhist Life Paid Member

  • Eido Shimano Roshi and Zen Studies Society in the Times Paid Member

    Mark Oppenheimer covers the Eido Shimano Roshi story in The New York Times. He begins: Sooner or later, every traditional faith has to confront sexual impropriety by its spiritual leaders: extramarital sex, or sex with the wrong people (members of the congregation, minors) or, for supposedly celibate clergy, any sex at all. But there are great differences in how religions handle these transgressions. For Jews and many Protestants, it is the local congregation that decides what sins are too great to countenance, and what kind of discipline is needed. For Roman Catholics, a worldwide hierarchy decides, depending on reports from local representatives. And for Buddhists — well, the answer is not so clear. The root of the problem, some experts say, is that the teacher/student relationship in Buddhism has no obvious Western analogy. More »