Tricycle

  • Move over, Park 51, now the Buddhists want a temple! Paid Member

    I can't guess at how many Americans would support or oppose the building of a Buddhist temple in Walnut, California, but I do know that someone there in high places is against it. And the US government isn't too happy about it. The AP reports: LOS ANGELES — The U.S. Justice Department has filed a religious discrimination lawsuit against the Southern California city of Walnut, claiming it unfairly denied a permit to a group seeking to build and run a Buddhist center. More »
  • Nalanda to rise from the ashes Paid Member

    It's looking more and more likely nowadays that the legendary Indian university of Nalanda, which at its peak  taught 10,000 students and employed 2,000 faculty, will rise again, according to AFP. The site is more than the heap of bricks that so many other Buddhist historical ruins have become over the centuries. You can still see the general plan, some monks' cells, and you can even get a pretty good idea of what it must have looked like. Maybe that's one of the reasons it's such an attractive candidate for rebuilding. Nalanda was founded in the 3rd century, in what today is the northeastern Indian state of Bihar, and later became one of the world's most well-known learning centers of its time. More »
  • Take a virtual tour of Coyote Man's home Paid Member

    If you've ever picked up a copy of Tricycle you've probably seen Coyote Man, artist Neal Crosbie's recurring coyote cartoon. Over the years we've followed Coyote Man past pine trees, up Mt. Fuji, over land on horseback and on foot, and even onto the face of a dollar bill. Now we can track him from the moment of creation---in Crosbie's California studio. The ink painter's website now offers a virtual tour of Coyote Man's home, check out the video here here. As for Coyote Man's creator, here's the news from his neck of the woods: Lately besides painting pictures of clouds and pine trees, I've been singing songs which are unsteady and short. Songs in gratitude to the Buddhas and songs of apologies to the salmon. More »
  • Talking about nothing and making something of it Paid Member

    Tim McHenry never fails to impress. The Rubin Museum of Art's Director of programming, Tim produces series of talks that just get better and better. This time, he's making something out of nothing. Literally. He has put together a series of talks about, well, nothing. Among many others in the series, Oliver Sacks will speak with John Dugdale about "seeing nothing"; Nico Muhly and Andrew Solomon will talk about "lacunae"; and Peter Sellars and Raj Patel on the "economics of nothing. Other participants include Laurie Anderson, Robert Wilson, Even Ensler, Lama Surya Das and many, many more. I'll make as many as I can. The RMA is in Manhattan's Chelsea district. For more information, check out the website. More »
  • Waiting out the Dalai Lama may be China's big mistake Paid Member

    Waiting out the Dalai Lama may be a big mistake for China. Dealing with him now may be easier than what may follow in his wake. Lodi Gyari, the Dalai Lama's representative in Washington, writes this in the South China Morning Post, quoted yesterday in a blog post by New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof: More »
  • Green China? It's complicated... Paid Member

    "China provides a free environment for architects. We're not impeded by the complicated regional planning and bureaucratic red tape. Most importantly, China has great craftsmen who can help me visualize my architectural concepts." That's how American architect David Greenberg sees it, whose work for the past 12 years in China has been heavily influenced by his Zen practice. Greenberg was introduced to Zen in Hawaii by a Chinese master, who also suggested he learn the Tao. A recent work of Greenberg's is a treehouse "eco resort," overlooking the South China Sea, at the Nanshan Buddhist Culture Zone, Sanya, Hainan province. Greenberg is no fan of the Western-style buildings springing up across Chinese cities like mushrooms. As he tells xinhuanet.com: More »