Tricycle

  • Suggest Buddhist organizations and charities for the next "Good Work" section of Tricycle Paid Member

    As many of you might have noticed, recent issues of Tricycle include a "Good Work" section that features a selection of Buddhist not-for-profits and charities. By highlighting these organizations, which have ranged from BuddhaBadges to Help Animals India, we hope to help them generate publicity and funding. Now we're looking for suggestions for the Spring 2011 "Good Work" section and we need your help. Send recommendations to info@tricycle.com or post them directly below. Look for the latest installment of "Good Work" in the upcoming Winter issue, on newsstands early November! More »
  • Don't ponder others Paid Member

    Every Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, a senior teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha’s 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa’s Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche’s commentaries on the lojong teachings. Each entry includes a practice. See the previous slogans and commentaries here. 26. Don’t ponder others. From Acharya Lief's commentary on this slogan, More »
  • 4 days of Tibetan Buddhism at Emory University Paid Member

    Tricycle's newest intern, Alexander Caring-Lobel, despite having not yet worked a full day in the office, just spent the last few days in Atlanta covering the 2010 International Conference on Tibetan Buddhism and the Dalai Lama's current visit to the US.  Alex is a graduate of Emory University, completed the  Emory Tibetan Studies/Institute of Buddhist Dialectics Program in India, and is currently studying classical Tibetan at Columbia. via an email I just received, Yesterday, the International Conference on Tibetan Buddhism came to a close, wrapping up four days of Tibetan Buddhist events at Emory University.  The Tibetan Buddhist extravaganza in Atlanta comprised of two overlapping programs: “The Visit” of HHDL and the International Conference on Tibetan Buddhism. More »
  • Katy Butler on Buddhism, journalism, and Jeff Bridges Paid Member

    Katy Butler is a practicing Buddhist and storied journalist, having written for publications ranging from Vogue to Tricycle. In addition to conducting Tricycle’s recent interview with actor Jeff Bridges, this summer Katy wrote one of the New York Times Magazine’s most-emailed articles, “What Broke My Father’s Heart: How a Pacemaker Wrecked a Family’s Life.” More »
  • Wake-up call: You don't have to do whatever your guru says Paid Member

    Buddhism's development in the West has sometimes been rocky, particularly with regard to teacher-student relationships. With decades of experience under his belt, Ken McLeod offers some sound advice in a 2002 interview: In the Vajrayana tradition it appears that you have to do whatever your guru says. But that’s absurd in this country. It just isn’t going to happen. America and most Western cultures are post-modern societies. They did away with the external structures that used to define role and position. Not so long ago, if your father was a shoemaker you would become one, and that sort of thing still prevails in a lot of places in the world. With modern education you have to figure out what you want to do — you have to develop the internal ability to define your own path. The same thing is true of marriage, economic position, education, political persuasion, and moral attitudes. More »
  • Why we fight online Paid Member