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    Bomb Blasts Rock Buddhist Pilgrimage Site in India Paid Member

    A series of low intensity bombs detonated inside the Mahabodhi temple complex in Bodh Gaya, India early on Sunday morning, leaving one Burmese monk and one Nepalese monk injured. One of the most-visited pilgrimage sites for Buddhists, the complex stands next to an iteration of the Bodhi tree under which Siddhartha Gautama, the historical Buddha, is said to have attained enlightenment. Four explosions went off inside the temple complex, three by a nearby monastery, and another by a Buddha statue, according to India's Home Secretary. At least two other bombs were defused.Although there were around 200 people in the temple complex when the bombs began exploding, no deaths and only two injuries have been reported. The temple complex and the Bodhi tree sustained minimal damage from the small blasts. More »
  • Himalayan Buddhist Art 101: Controversial Art, Part 4 - The Female Nude Paid Member

    Buddhist practice and Buddhist art have been inseparable in the Himalayas ever since Buddhism arrived to the region in the eighth century. But for the casual observer it can be difficult to make sense of the complex iconography. Not to worry—Himalayan art scholar Jeff Watt is here to help. In this "Himalayan Buddhist Art 101" series, Jeff is making sense of this rich artistic tradition by presenting weekly images from the Himalayan Art Resources archives and explaining their roles in the Buddhist tradition. More »
  • Consider the Source: Is the Buddha's Hairdo Greek? Paid Member

    The brilliant scholar, writer, and postmodernist art critic Thomas McEvilley died in March of this year, but his scholarship may yet spawn a renaissance in our understanding of the ancient world. His epic work, The Shape of Ancient Thought, advances a breathtaking perspective on how ancient philosophies grew and influenced one another. Our view of the philosophical and religious development of Greece, Rome, South Asia, and even East Asia may undergo a sea change if the arguments in this book are widely recognized. It is certainly important that past and future archeological work be held up against McEvilley’s insights. More »
  • Treasury of Lives: The 7th Dalai Lama Paid Member

    Biography and autobiography in Tibet are important sources for both education and inspiration. Tibetans have kept such meticulous records of their teachers that thousands of names are known and discussed in a wide range of biographical material. All these names, all these lives—it can be a little overwhelming. The authors involved in the Treasury of Lives are currently mining the primary sources to provide English-language biographies of every known religious teacher from Tibet and the Himalaya, all of which are organized for easy searching and browsing. Every Tuesday on the Tricycle blog, we will highlight and reflect on important, interesting, eccentric, surprising and beautiful stories found within this rich literary tradition. More »
  • Trike Contributing Editor David Loy takes on "McMindfulness" Paid Member

    Over at the Huffington Post, Tricycle contributing editor David Loy and Ron Purser take on the trend of "McMindfulness," a quickly growing (and lucrative) industry slinging a form of secularized mindfulness deracinated from its ethical context. Proponents of mindfulness training often brand their teachings as Buddhist-inspired, the authors note, but in the same breath deny the practice's ties to its origins, assuring their corporate clients and sponsors that the technique is purely secular. While "uncoupling mindfulness from its ethical and religious Buddhist context is understandable...the rush to commodify mindfulnesss into a marketable technique" has a number of undesirable results. More »
  • We Are Not Kind Machines Paid Member

    Science seems omnipresent in the modern world, and its explanatory force and benefits are hard to deny. Indeed, its success has even led some, including a number of well-regarded figures in the contemporary Buddhist world, to argue that the dharma itself must be made more “scientific” if it is to survive. More »