Tricycle

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Buddhist Humor Online: Buddhisthumor.org Paid Member

    At an event in the Tricycle office several hundred million years ago, Tricycle editor James Shaheen posed a question to the throngs of devas, nagas, goblins, demons, and bodhisattvas (numbering eighteen million in all) in attendance: "What would you like to see more of in the pages of Tricycle?" From the back of the room, a young man of good family known by some as Lama Surya Das called out bravely, "More humor!" Lo, he was not obliged (or if he was, it was just barely.) Today, billions of years after this auspicious gathering of one hundred and eighty million bodhisattvas and Pratyekabuddhas, longtime Tricycle readers will recall the humorous writings of P. B. Law, who has contributed such pieces as "Bodhisattva in the Rye" and "Winnie-the-Buddhist" over the years. More »
  • Wisdom 2.0 NYC! December 11th at UrbanZen Paid Member

    This Saturday, December 11th, 2011, from 10 AM to 7 PM, there will be a unique event at UrbanZen in New York City. Tricycle is pleased to co-sponsor this Wisdom 2.0 event that explores living with presence and purpose in our modern technology-rich age. With all the new technology today, it's easier than ever to live "disconnectedly connected," where we are connected to others through technology but largely disconnected from ourselves. The tools easily become our masters instead of our servants. More »
  • se necesita un ser realizado Paid Member

    We were recently asked permission to have a Tricycle article translated and published in Spanish. Here's what it looks like. It's Tai Situpa Rinpoche's "It Takes a Saint," and it appears in the most recent edition of Cuadernos de budismo, a quarterly magazine based in Spain. We are especially fond of the young man meditating in a suit. Read the piece in English here. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Hang on to your Tricycle Paid Member

    The sharp-eyed Frank Olinsky—Tricycle's first designer and now a contributing editor—often sends us photos from around his Brooklyn neighborhood that he thinks we'll like. (You may remember his "Discount Buddha," which some failed to find amusing.) What do you think his latest photo is saying? More »
  • Shinnyo-en's Boundless Prayer Ceremony: the Saisho Homa Paid Member

    Because we commonly associate Vajrayana Buddhism with Tibet, it can surprise some that forms of Vajrayana have persisted in Japan as well. One historical center of Japanese Vajrayana is Daigoji monastery, home of the Daigo school of Shingon Buddhism. Founded in 874, the monastery is still operating today.   In 1936, a prolific sculptor and member of Daigoji’s priesthood, Shinjo Ito (1906-1989), founded the Shinnyo-en ("Garden of Absolute Reality") school, whose central canonical text is the Mahaparinirvana Sutra, said to be the last of the Buddha’s sermons. The current issue of Tricycle features an interview with Her Holiness Shinso Ito, daughter of Shinjo and current leader of the Shinnyo-en school of Buddhism.  More »