Tricycle

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    New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care and Tricycle Paid Member

    The New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care is holding an awards ceremony and silent auction this evening in New York City. Honorees include Dr. Diane Meier, Dr. Russell Portenoy, and Sharon Salzberg. Tricycle is pleased to be a media sponsor of this event. Read more about the ceremony here. NYZCCC was founded in 2006 by Zen Buddhist priests and chaplains Koshin Paley Ellison and Robert Chodo Campbell. The center provides compassionate care to the sick and the terminally ill and creates a supportive, nurturing environment for people to consciously face their illness and/or end-of-life journey. This work is done through direct care partnerships with leading healthcare providers in the New York area, caregiver and pastoral training programs, and by actively advocating for contemplative care at the national level. Since August 2007: More »
  • Zen Teachers write an open letter to Dennis Genpo Merzel Paid Member

    Dozens of Zen teachers have signed onto yet another letter to Dennis Genpo Merzel, imploring him to change his ways. With regret they note they have little hope he will. We received the letter today and it appears below, followed by Merzel's original letter of apology. A few of the signatories themselves have been directly linked to the mess or messes like it, as you may have read here, where we give some background to a series of recent revelations that rocked Zen communities. While the squeaky wheels in the White Plum Asangha have been getting all the oil lately, overlooked is the wonderful legacy of Maezumi Roshi, whatever his flaws, whose teachings continue to be passed along by his numerous heirs in thriving communities across the country. More »
  • Awake in the World: Forgiveness Paid Member

    (Left to Right: Helen Whitney, Reverend Petero Sabune, Donald Shriver, Sensei Nancy Mujo Baker, Helen Tworkov) More »
  • Awake at the Wheel Paid Member

    Last week, several Tricycle staffers traveled to Carmel, New York to visit the Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi at Chuang Yen Monastery. Sam Mowe describes it here and provides some visual aids. (The monastery was pretty mind-blowing.) But he left out the driving part. Carmel is a bit off the beaten path and it's easiest to get there with a car. I drove. I don't remember why but it was a bit like musical chairs: We were at the car rental place and everyone piled into the car and I was left outside and the only empty seat was the driver's. So exercising the millennia-old "driver's privilege" of controlling the radio, for the ride back I decided to pop in Awake at the Wheel: Mindful Driving with Michele McDonald, which we've had in the office for a little while, but, since we live in New York City, we haven't had much chance to put into practice. More »
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    Tricycle visits Bhikkhu Bodhi at Chuang Yen Monastery Paid Member

    Earlier this week, some Tricyclers were lucky enough to make it up to Carmel, New York in order to visit with Bhikkhu Bodhi at Chuang Yen Monastery. Chuang Yen is a Chinese Chán monastery, and my colleague Monty was immediately moved by the fact that Bhikkhu Bodhi, a Theravada Monk, takes residence there, saying, "At the end of the day Buddhists truly are one big family." More »
  • The 100 most spiritually influential People? Guess who's #1... Paid Member

    No, it's not the Dalai Lama or Thich Nhat Hanh—they come in second and fourth, respectively—according to the Watkins Review's "100 Spiritual Power List," which appeared earlier this month. The review is put out by Watkins Books, the century-old London book store specializing in esoterica. Their selection criteria? There are several factors that were taken into account when compiling the list. Listed below are the main three: 1) The person has to be alive 2) The person has to have made a unique and spiritual contribution on a global scale 3) The person is frequently googled, appears in Nielsen Data, and highlighted in throughout the blogosphere It’s interesting to think about the amount of times that a person is googled; in a sense, being googled is a form of digital voting, and illustrates just how often someone is being sought outMore »