Tricycle Talks

  • Tricycle Talks: Jason Siff on Unlearning Meditation Paid Member

    Why does meditation have to be so hard? According to Jason Siff, there is an inherent tension in meditation practice between your mind as it is and the meditation instructions you use. In his book Unlearning Meditation: What to Do When the Instructions Get in the Way (the December Tricycle Book Club selection), Siff encourages us to take a bird’s-eye view of our meditation instructions so that we can see the concepts and beliefs that are embedded within them. When we get behind the instructions and understand how the concepts within them function, we find that we often sort our meditation experiences into acceptable and unacceptable, right and wrong. More »
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    Tricycle Talks: Ken McLeod speaks to Richard Eskow, Part 3 of 3 Paid Member

    Teacher and translator Ken McLeod and Tricycle Contributing Editor Richard Eskow got acquainted at the 2011 Buddhist Geeks Conference in Los Angeles. (In 2012, the conference will be in Boulder.) They enjoyed their talks so much that they decided to meet up after the conference and continue talking, and they were gracious enough to share it with us. Part 3 of their conversation is below. In this third and final installment, they discuss the idea of "the enemy." As Ken McLeod says, "We regard someone as an enemy when they elicit in us feelings that we cannot tolerate." Listen to Part 1 and Part 2 of this discussion. More »
  • Tricycle Talks: Allan Lokos on Patience Paid Member

    Listen to Tricycle's Sam Mowe speak with Allan Lokos about his new book Patience: The Art of Peaceful Living, the current selection at the Tricycle Book Club. Topics include: Is impatience ever a virtue? What's the relationship between mindfulness and patience? How can a person cultivate patience?Allan Lokos is the founder and guiding teacher of the Community Meditation Center in New York City. More »
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    Tricycle Talks: Ken McLeod speaks to Richard Eskow, Part 2 of 3 Paid Member

    At the 2011 Buddhist Geeks conference (the next will be in Boulder in August 2012) Tricycle Contributing Editor Richard Eskow spoke to teacher and translator Ken McLeod. Their conversation was so fruitful they decided to meet up after the conference and continue talking, and they were gracious enough to share it with us. Part 2 of their conversation is below. In this second of three installments, they discuss the controversial idea of the Buddha as a scientist. This sounds very clinical and rational, but McLeod points out that the very idea of being a scientist is itself based on a set of beliefs. "Science," McLeod says, "is the unacknowledged religion of our age." More »
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    Tricycle Talks #5: Roshi Bodhin Kjolhede Paid Member

    Bodhin Kjolhede is the roshi and abbot of the Rochester Zen Center in Rochester, New York. Founded by Philip Kapleau in 1966, RZC is one of the oldest and largest centers of Zen practice outside Asia. Roshi Kjolhede is leading the January Tricycle Retreat, The Precepts as Practice, and speaks to us in the Tricycle Talk about whether "enlightened masters" can move beyond the need to follow the precepts, how the precepts differ from the Ten Commandments, and how someone who has fallen off the wagon and is not living according to the precepts can get back on track. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Tricycle Talks: Ken McLeod speaks to Richard Eskow, Part 1 of 3 Paid Member

    At the 2011 Buddhist Geeks conference (the next will be in Boulder in August 2012) Tricycle Contributing Editor Richard Eskow got into a bunch of stimulting conversations. One of those he spoke with was a fellow frequent contributor to Tricycle, teacher and translator Ken McLeod. They decided to meet up after the conference and continue their conversation, and they were gracious enough to share it with us. Part one of their conversation is below. In this wide-ranging discussion, they touch on a fascinating point that Eskow characterizes as a "dirty little secret" of the dharma: the question of paying for teachings. Listen below. More »