Tricycle Community

  • Church bans yoga Paid Member

    Reading the tabloids is a bad habit I've developed this summer. I've weaned myself off most of them, though, but I can't quite quit the British tabloid the Sun ("Got a story? We pay £££"). Today's edition reports that a Methodist church near Manchester has banished an over-50s yoga group, leaving elderly yogis throwing up their hands. The church's new minister fears the yogis could be preaching "rival religions"—more specifically, Hinduism and Buddhism. Iris Turner, a 64-year-old yogini, isn't happy with the church's new minister, Rev. Amanda Roper: "Her views are extreme," she tells the Sun. "We are hurt, disappointed and offended."  Mrs. Turner invited Rev. More »
  • Coming Soon to the Tricycle Community: A Discussion on the Poems of "the angry monk," Gendun Chopel Paid Member

    Join us at the Tricycle Community Poetry Club from July 26th through August 2nd for a discussion with Professor Donald S. Lopez Jr., the translator and editor of In the Forest of Faded Wisdom: 104 Poems by Gendun Chopel. A highly regarded modern Tibetan poet, Gendun Chopel is also known as "the angry monk." Here is Lopez's commentary on poem number 33. The poem itself is below: More »
  • Rodney Smith at the Tricycle Community Book Club Paid Member

    Join us Monday, July 26 at the Tricycle Community Book Club for the discussion of Rodney Smith's Stepping Out of Self-Deception: The Buddha's Liberating Teaching of No-Self. Smith dives into the depths of the Buddha's teachings on no-self and impermanence, while remaining accessible and skillfully avoiding the risk of superficiality. It's one of those rare books that will appeal to both newcomers and to those with experience on the spiritual grind. From the introduction: More »
  • Bonnie Myotai Treace on Generosity and Attention Paid Member

    Week 2 of Bonnie Myotai Treace's Tricycle Retreat begins today. In this week's talk she elaborates on last week's theme of generosity and introduces the theme of attention. While stressing the importance of attention in practice she tells a story of a Japanese Emperor that visited a Zen master asking for a great teaching.  In response to the Emperor's request the master painted a calligraphy of the character for 'attention.' The Emperor thanked him but stated he was looking for more of a teaching than one simple character. Upon being asked to elaborate on this teaching, the master's response was simply to once again paint the character on another piece of paper and hand it to him.  This apparently went on for quite some time.  Eventually the Emperor saw that this repetitive action WAS the great teaching—that one must come back to attention again and again and again. More »
  • Deep Roots Need Good Soil Paid Member

    Today’s Daily Dharma: If you have a supportive sangha, it’s easy to nourish your bodhicitta, the seeds of enlightenment. If you don’t have anyone who understands you, who encourages you in the practice of the living dharma, your desire to practice may wither. Your sangha—family, friends, and copractitioners—is the soil, and you are the seed. No matter how vigorous the seed is, if the soil does not provide nourishment, your seed will die. A good sangha is crucial for the practice. Please find a good sangha or help create one. -Thich Nhat Hanh, "The Fertile soil of Sangha" Read the complete article here. More »
  • This is Getting Old: A discussion on aging at the Tricycle Community Book Club Paid Member

    We're discussing Susan Moon's new book, This is Getting Old: Zen Thoughts on Aging with Humor and Dignity, at the Tricycle Community Book Club this week. You can also listen to an interview with the author before moving on to the discussion. Bodhipaksa (known online for, among other things, his Fake Buddha Quotes) calls Susan Moon "one of Buddhism's funniest writers." More »