Tricycle Community

  • How to Be Sick by Toni Bernhard Paid Member

    The Tricycle Book Club is currently reading How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and their Caregivers by Toni Bernhard (Wisdom Publications, 2010, $15.95 paper, available in all e-book formats). Foreword by Sylvia Boorstein. Join us here from October 18-29 to discuss the book with the author (sign up is free and easy). From the last chapter of How to Be Sick: More »
  • Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners Part 2: History and Authority Paid Member

    At the Tricycle Community, we're hosting a discussion on Andrew Cooper's Tricycle article "History and Authority." (This was the working title of the article that was published as "What the Buddha Taught?") We've posted quite a few controversial articles in our day, and this one really hits a lot of key points to make the serious practitioner think about his or her tradition. Cooper writes that though we tend to think of religions being eternal and unchanging, the opposite is true: More »
  • The Power of an Open Question - The Big Bang Paid Member

    From within the fluid and ineffable state of boundarylessness, the knowing mind experiences a stirring . . . a discomfort of sorts.  Somehow it's not enough to just rest in the boundaryless nature of this discomfort.  The knower of this discomfort then acts, and leaves the open state to become the doer, or "subject."  And what do subjects do? They define, seduce, wrestle with, and push away objects.  And this dynamic exchange between subject and object creates a whole lot of friction and heat, which activates a big bang of sorts . . . And the whole world of objectification bursts into action. More »
  • The World is Made of Stories: To Understand is to Story Paid Member

    The September Tricycle Book Club is underway, and we're discussing David Loy's The World is Made of Stories. Join the conversation here (sign up is free and easy!). From the first chapter of The World is Made of Stories: If the world is made of stories, stories are not just stories. They teach us what is real, what is valuable, and what is possible. Without stories there is no way to engage with the world because there is no world, and no one to engage with it because there is no self. More »
  • Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners Paid Member

    Modern historical study challenges much in Buddhist tradition. Yet, as Rita Gross  writes in her article "Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners," understanding Buddhist history can enrich dharma practice by, among other things, demonstrating how Buddhist teachings and institutions are themselves impermanent and contingently arisen. What do you think? How does, or how might, the study of your own tradition challenge, inspire, inform, confuse, broaden, or deepen your relationship to it? —Andrew Cooper Join the discussion here. More »
  • At the Tricycle Book Club: An Interview With David Loy Paid Member

    David Loy is going to be at the Tricycle Book Club Monday, September 20 to discuss his latest book, The World is Made of Stories. If you are planning on joining the conversation (or aren't sure yet and need some convincing), you will enjoy listening to a Q&A about the book between Loy and Tricycle's Joan Duncan Oliver. During the interview Loy explains the big subject of his little book: what constitutes a story and why it matters. He also reads an excerpt from the The World is Made of Stories. More »