Travel

  • Beautiful photographs by photographer who shoot iconic cover for National Geographic Paid Member

    The work of the photographer who once captured the face of an Afghan girl for the iconic cover of National Geographic is now on display at the Birmingham Museum in Birmingham, England. Steve McCurry's photographs will be on display through mid-October in an exhibit titled Steve McCurry---Retrospective. In a recent interview with CNN, McCurry reflected on several decades of travel and photography and spoke about his interest in Buddhism: As a photographer, you want to serve, you want the story to be told, in the most accurate, balanced way, to inform and give people a voice," he said. While many of his images document people in times of hardship, others in his portfolio are joyful explorations of situations on his doorstep as well as in far-flung places. More »
  • The Power of an Open Question - "Ahhh..." Paid Member

  • A Visit to the Great Stupa of Dharmakaya Paid Member

    Last week I took a trip to Colorado and while I was there I was able to visit the Great Stupa of Dharmakaya at Shambhala Mountain Center, the largest stupa in North America.  Below are some pictures I took during my visit. To learn more about the the Great Stupa, click here. More »
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    800 years later, Nalanda University is Back Paid Member

    Nalanda University was big time. Right outside Rajgir, or Vulture’s Peak in the northeastern Indian state of Bihar, in its prime it had over 10,000 students, 2,000 staff, and denied 80% of its applicants. It would be hard to overstate how big time it was, and not just in Buddhist history. Dating back to the fifth century, it was one of the first institutions of higher learning in the world. Scholars came from all over the world to study philosophy, medicine, astronomy, and other subjects. Today it lies in ruins. There are plans, however, to revive the ruins and return Nalanda to its former glory as an active center of learning. Well, actually, the plan is to build a new Nalanda—while retaining the spirit of the original—next to the physical ruins. Andrew Buncombe, reporting for the Independent, writes: More »
  • Amid turmoil, Pakistan reaches out to Buddhist tourists Paid Member

    The Guardian's Riazat Butt calls it a case of fiddling while Rome burns: Pakistan reaches out to Buddhists amid allegations that its intelligence service is actively aiding the Taliban while putatively aiding US/Coalition forces in Afghanistan. (The war is of course taking place on Pakistani soil as well, the border region being so nebulous and porous.) UPDATE: A plane crashed in Pakistan today, killing 152 people.) More »