Tibetan Buddhism

  • Seven Tips for Giving Up Gossip Paid Member

    by Bhikshuni Thubten Chodron 1. Recognize that gossip doesn’t undo the situation you’re talking about. It only puts in motion another situation based on negative feelings. 2. Know that comparing yourself to others is useless. Everyone has his or her own talents. In this way, give up jealousy and the wish to put others down. 3. Be aware of and transform your own thoughts, words, and deeds rather than commenting on those of others. 4. Train your mind to see others’ positive qualities and discuss them. This will make you much happier than gossiping ever could. 5. Forgive, knowing that people do harmful things because they are unhappy. If you don’t make someone into an enemy, you won’t want to gossip about him. More »
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    The Karmapa on Hip-Hop & Video War Games: : "The aggression that comes out in the video game satiates whatever desire I might have to express that feeling." Paid Member

    Video game site kotaku.com points us to an interview with Trinley Dorje, the 17th Karmapa (the one recognized by the Dalai Lama and the Chinese government), who enjoys hip-hop and considers video war games a kind of "emotional therapy": I believe you like to listen to hip-hop on your ipod. Who are your favourite artistes? I can't think of any specific artists right now, I basically listen to what ever comes my way, whatever sounds appealing. It's important for me to stick to my traditional forms of art because I am a Tibetan Buddhist teacher wearing these robes. It's important for me to maintain my cultural affiliations. More »
  • Praise and Blame Paid Member

    If we really stop to think about praise and criticism, we will see they do not have the least importance. Whether we receive praise or criticism is of no account. The only important thing is that we have a pure motivation, and let the law of cause and effect be our witness. If we are really honest, we can see that it makes no difference whether we receive praise and acclaim. The whole world might sing our praises, but if we have done something wrong, then we will still have to suffer the consequences for ourselves, and we cannot escape them. If we act only out of a pure motivation, all the beings of the three realms can criticize and rebuke us, but none of them will be able to cause us to suffer. According to the law of karma, each and every one of us must answer individually for our actions. This is how we can put a stop to these kinds of thoughts altogether, by seeing how they are completely insubstantial, like dreams or magical illusions. More »
  • Good! - Daily Dharma, September 15th, 2009 Paid Member

    When you ask accomplished teachers how they are, they always say, “Good, good, very good” — always good. Many people say that they feel dishonest saying they are good when in fact they have problems. But what we are talking about here is developing a fundamental sense of strength and well-being. Wouldn’t it be better to associate our mind with that rather than with all the fleeting emotions and physical sensations we experience throughout the day? What is the point of being honest about something so fleeting and impossible to pin down? More »
  • Prayer flags a problem in Bhutan Paid Member

    The Bhutanese government is facing an unexpected threat to its country's natural environment: prayer flags. Each year, Bhutan's citizens cut down thousands of trees to use a poles for Buddhist prayer flags, according to a Reuters report posted on the Buddhist Channel. This is making for a legal conundrum. Bhutan's famed Gross National Happiness index requires that forest-cover make up at least 60 percent of the Himalayan kingdom's landscape—but Buddhism, a guiding philosophy of the policy, is now contributing to the gradual deforestation of the region. Fortunately, it seems that a solution is in the works. The government is growing bamboo plants, with the hope that these will make for an acceptable substitute. [Image: TiagoPereira] More »
  • Pema Chödrön and William Alexander in two new discussions on the Tricycle Community Paid Member

    The Tricycle Book Club will be discussing Pema Chödrön's latest book, Taking the Leap: Freeing Ourselves from Old Habits and Fears. More »