Tibetan Buddhism

  • 'Lama, Patron, Artist' at the Smithsonian Paid Member

    As reported by the Washington Post, There are two things most Westerners think they know about Buddhism: It's the one religion that can accommodate atheists, and one of its goals is to escape the material cycles of this world in favor of an immaterial enlightenment. That's why "Lama, Patron, Artist: The Great Situ Panchen," newly opened at the Smithsonian's Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, may come as a surprise. This landmark show, which was organized by the Rubin Museum for Himalayan art in New York, seems to have a fully religious, god-filled sensibility -- no atheistic doubt in sight -- as expressed through the most deluxe of material goods. More »
  • China's handpicked Panchen Lama "elected" Vice President of Buddhist group Paid Member

    As reported by phayul.com: More »
  • What is the Right Way to Sit? Paid Member

    Different Buddhist schools recommend a variety of meditative postures. Some emphasize a still, formal posture, while others are less strict and more focused on internal movements of consciousness. Tibetan traditions, for instance, advise an upright spine, erect but relaxed; hands at rest in the lap, with the belly soft; shoulders relaxed, chin slightly tucked, and the gaze lowered with eyelids half shut; the jaw is slack with the tongue behind the upper teeth; the legs are crossed. A Soto Zen Buddhist saying instructs us to sit with formal body and informal mind. The common essential point is to remain balanced and alert, so as to pierce the veil of samsaric illusion. –Lama Surya Das, from “The Heart of Buddhist Meditation,” Tricycle, Winter 2007 Read the full article: The Heart of Buddhist Meditation More »
  • Come and See Paid Member

    Perhaps because of our Judeo-Christian background, we have a tendency to regard doubt as something shameful, almost as an enemy. We feel that if we have doubts, it means that we are denying the teachings and that we should really have unquestioning faith. Now in certain religions, unquestioning faith is considered a desirable quality. But in the Buddha-dharma, this is not necessarily so. Referring to the dharma, the Buddha said, “ehi passiko,” which means “come and see,” or “come and investigate,” not “come and believe.” An open, questioning mind is not regarded as a drawback to followers of the Buddha-dharma. However, a mind that says, “This is not part of my mental framework, therefore I don't believe it,” is a closed mind, and such an attitude is a great disadvantage for those who aspire to follow any spiritual path. More »
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    "Touching Enlightenment," by Reggie Ray Paid Member

    After years of meditation, you may feel you're making very little progress. But the guide you may need has been with you all along: your body. Drawing on Tibetan Yogic practices, Reggie Ray takes on the modern crisis of disembodiment. Read "Touching Enlightenment." More »
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    Now is the Time Paid Member

    Now is the time to free ourselves from samsara. Unless we do it in this lifetime, it is not going to happen all by itself. We have to take care of ourselves. Right now we have the ability to receive teachings and practice the Dharma. Isn’t this the right time? Wouldn’t that be better than continuing to act like an animal, concentrating only on eating and sleeping and letting the time run out? Why not take your future into your own hands? - Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche, "Taking the Future into Your Own Hands," Tricycle, Fall 2001 Read the complete article on tricycle.com Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »