Tibetan Buddhism

  • Come and See Paid Member

    Perhaps because of our Judeo-Christian background, we have a tendency to regard doubt as something shameful, almost as an enemy. We feel that if we have doubts, it means that we are denying the teachings and that we should really have unquestioning faith. Now in certain religions, unquestioning faith is considered a desirable quality. But in the Buddha-dharma, this is not necessarily so. Referring to the dharma, the Buddha said, “ehi passiko,” which means “come and see,” or “come and investigate,” not “come and believe.” An open, questioning mind is not regarded as a drawback to followers of the Buddha-dharma. However, a mind that says, “This is not part of my mental framework, therefore I don't believe it,” is a closed mind, and such an attitude is a great disadvantage for those who aspire to follow any spiritual path. More »
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    "Touching Enlightenment," by Reggie Ray Paid Member

    After years of meditation, you may feel you're making very little progress. But the guide you may need has been with you all along: your body. Drawing on Tibetan Yogic practices, Reggie Ray takes on the modern crisis of disembodiment. Read "Touching Enlightenment." More »
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    Now is the Time Paid Member

    Now is the time to free ourselves from samsara. Unless we do it in this lifetime, it is not going to happen all by itself. We have to take care of ourselves. Right now we have the ability to receive teachings and practice the Dharma. Isn’t this the right time? Wouldn’t that be better than continuing to act like an animal, concentrating only on eating and sleeping and letting the time run out? Why not take your future into your own hands? - Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche, "Taking the Future into Your Own Hands," Tricycle, Fall 2001 Read the complete article on tricycle.com Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Why Are You Doing This? Daily Dharma, September 28th, 2009 Paid Member

    Before you do anything, you should ask yourself why you are doing it, what is your purpose; what course of action are you embarking on. If the path ahead seems troublesome, perhaps you shouldn't take it; if it looks worthwhile, you can probably proceed. First, check up. Don't act without knowing what's in store for you. –Lama Thubten Yeshe, from “Your Mind is Your Religion,” Tricycle, Summer 2000 Read the complete article. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Three Takes on Nirvana Paid Member

    Nirvana, the ultimate goal of Buddhist practice, is a notoriously difficult concept to pin down, not least because it is sometimes described as being "beyond experience" or "beyond words." This is another way of saying that we here in samsara have a hard time wrapping our heads around what this transcendent experience would mean. And to complicate things further, the different Buddhist traditions often have very different understandings of what precisely "nirvana" means. Some time ago, we asked three dharma teachers to help us understand this better: Vipassana teacher Gil Fronsdal, Tibetan-born Tulku Thubten Rinpoche, and Zen teacher Roko Sherry Chayat. You can read all three takes here. [Image: Tisra Til, 2005, mixed media on canvas, 120 x 140 inches. © Antonio Puri] More »
  • Namkha Rinpoche visits Tricycle Paid Member

    Sopranos actor Michael Imperioli (aka Christopher Moltisanti) presented his film The Hungry Ghosts, his directorial debut, at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City this month. The screening was a fundraiser for Namkha Rinpoche's charitable organization, The Golden Bridge Association, a not-for-profit dedicated to humanitarian aid and the preservation of Tibetan culture and religion. More »