Tibetan Buddhism

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    Acharya Judy Lief's Commentary on Atisha's 59 Lojong Slogans Paid Member

    Today, the first post of Acharya Judy Lief's commentary on the 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans was posted on Tricycle's website. Judy will continue writing comments on the slogans every week throughout the coming year. Read her first post here. Judy prefaces her series of comments with a bit of history: a brief retelling of the story of Atisha (980-1052 CE) who revitalized Buddhism in Tibet and brought the secret lojong teachings to the roof of the world. Initially the teachings were a closely guarded secret, but now, to the great good fortune of us all, they are available for the world to study. More »
  • Dartmouth College's Buddhism and Medicine Seminar Paid Member

    Our friends at Dartmouth College and the Upper Valley Zen Center were kind enough to inform us of their upcoming Seminar on Buddhism and Medicine.  It looks like quite an event! BUDDHISM AND MEDICINE Perspectives on Life, Death, and the Healing Arts A Seminar at Dartmouth College, Friday, April 16th, 4:00 pm to Saturday, April 17th 4:30 pm More »
  • 'Lama, Patron, Artist' at the Smithsonian Paid Member

    As reported by the Washington Post, There are two things most Westerners think they know about Buddhism: It's the one religion that can accommodate atheists, and one of its goals is to escape the material cycles of this world in favor of an immaterial enlightenment. That's why "Lama, Patron, Artist: The Great Situ Panchen," newly opened at the Smithsonian's Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, may come as a surprise. This landmark show, which was organized by the Rubin Museum for Himalayan art in New York, seems to have a fully religious, god-filled sensibility -- no atheistic doubt in sight -- as expressed through the most deluxe of material goods. More »
  • China's handpicked Panchen Lama "elected" Vice President of Buddhist group Paid Member

    As reported by phayul.com: More »
  • What is the Right Way to Sit? Paid Member

    Different Buddhist schools recommend a variety of meditative postures. Some emphasize a still, formal posture, while others are less strict and more focused on internal movements of consciousness. Tibetan traditions, for instance, advise an upright spine, erect but relaxed; hands at rest in the lap, with the belly soft; shoulders relaxed, chin slightly tucked, and the gaze lowered with eyelids half shut; the jaw is slack with the tongue behind the upper teeth; the legs are crossed. A Soto Zen Buddhist saying instructs us to sit with formal body and informal mind. The common essential point is to remain balanced and alert, so as to pierce the veil of samsaric illusion. –Lama Surya Das, from “The Heart of Buddhist Meditation,” Tricycle, Winter 2007 Read the full article: The Heart of Buddhist Meditation More »
  • Come and See Paid Member

    Perhaps because of our Judeo-Christian background, we have a tendency to regard doubt as something shameful, almost as an enemy. We feel that if we have doubts, it means that we are denying the teachings and that we should really have unquestioning faith. Now in certain religions, unquestioning faith is considered a desirable quality. But in the Buddha-dharma, this is not necessarily so. Referring to the dharma, the Buddha said, “ehi passiko,” which means “come and see,” or “come and investigate,” not “come and believe.” An open, questioning mind is not regarded as a drawback to followers of the Buddha-dharma. However, a mind that says, “This is not part of my mental framework, therefore I don't believe it,” is a closed mind, and such an attitude is a great disadvantage for those who aspire to follow any spiritual path. More »