Tibetan Buddhism

  • World Cup 2010 Paid Member

    Back in 2007, three years before professional soccer teams were set to descend on South Africa's cities, 2010 World Cup fever was already taking hold. In Cape Town, where I was living at the time, billboards, posters, and television ads encouraged South Africans to keep the cities clean and safe in preparation for their 2010 visitors and hotels and restaurants had begun remodeling in anticipation of the hordes of fans. It will be the first World Cup to be held on the African continent, and South Africa—whose political, social, and financial troubles are well documented—has a lot riding on the month-long event. Now, two days before the ref's whistle signals the start of the first game between South Africa and Mexico, World Cup madness has reached a hysterical pitch—both within the host country and in the far-flung corners of the globe. More »
  • Saving the world one punk badge at a time Paid Member

    A little grassroots non-profit art project named BuddhaBadges was recently brought to my attention by John of the blog ZenDirtZenDust.  Wonderful in its simplicity and with some solid artistic design behind it, Buddhabadges sells one-inch Buddhist punk badges over the web for a dollar a piece to help raise money for a rotating roster of respectable charities.   Ninety percent of their sales are donated, with the remaining ten percent going towards materials to make more badges. More »
  • "The Buddha's actually right here..." Paid Member

    Here's Reggie Ray on Facebook: You read these books on Tibetan Buddhism, and it’s very 
complicated. Has anyone read any
 of those books? They’re very 
complicated. There are a lot of
 stages and paths and different levels, and sometimes you become completely
...confused. Eventually you begin to 
feel that the Buddha’s way up there you can barely see the top of the ladder—and it’s very important to remember that actually that’s a metaphor, and the Buddha’s actually right here. The closer we come to our own heart, the more we have gone through what they’re talking about. More »
  • Judy Lief on Absolute and Relative Bodhichitta Paid Member

    We're very lucky to have Acharya Judy Lief writing commentary on the lojong (mind-training) slogans at tricycle.com. As she writes in her introduction to Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche's classic Training the Mind, "Through slogan practice, we begin to realize that our habitual tendency, even in our smallest gestures, is one of self-centeredness." She also writes that the slogans "form a loop in which nothing is excluded." The playful and sometimes ironic tone of the slogans should not fool us: Lojong is a complete path of practice all on its own. She has a new post up today discussing absolute and relative bodhichitta, in which she writes: More »
  • English Translation of the Dalai Lama/Chinese Citizens Twitter Talk Paid Member

    The New York Review of Books posted the May 21 Twitter conversation between the Dalai Lama and Chinese citizens in its entirety. Perry Link translated the dialogue and explains how such an event was able to take place. So how did Wang Lixiong do it? First he asked representatives of the Dalai Lama, who is on a tour of the U.S., for an hour of time in which the Tibetan religious leader might answer questions from Chinese citizens. The Dalai Lama agreed to use the hour of 8 to 9 a.m. (EST) on May 21 for this purpose. Wang then arranged to open a Twitter page beginning on May 17 at 10:30 a.m. (Beijing time), onto which Chinese Web users could pose questions. More »
  • Celebrating the Return of Khyentse Rinpoche Paid Member

    I am very happy to help spread the news about Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche's first visit to the United States this August.  This trip will both serve as a commemoration of the life of Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche (1910-1991) on the one-hundredth anniversary of his birth as well as a welcoming of his current incarnation, Khyentse Yangsi, to the United States.  May it be the first of many! More »