Tibetan Buddhism

  • Are Tibetans superhuman? Paid Member

    How is it that Tibetans thrive at 13,000 feet, where those of us born closer to sea level get sick? Scientists now think that Tibetans have evolved while most of the rest of us have stood still: Recent research shows that Tibetans, who have lived isolated in these high altitudes for thousands of years, enjoy a genetic variation that keeps their hemoglobin levels in a normal range. A variation of EPAS1, a gene that is sometimes associated with increased athleticism, causes an enzymatic change in the way oxygen binds to blood and is transported around the body. Compared to lowland Chinese, Tibetans thrive in high altitude—they do not suffer from chronic altitude sickness and their children are born with normal weight. More »
  • Spanish soccer star Puyol takes keen interest in Buddhism Paid Member

    Spanish striker Carles Puyol has a keen interest in Tibetan Buddhism, according to phayul.com. The soccer star, who plays for Barcelona, met the Dalai Lama when His Holiness visited that city. With Spain's World Cup victory yesterday, we can expect Puyol to be in the news in coming weeks, and no doubt we'll learn more. Puyol's friend Ven. Wangchen told the Voice of America that "Puyol's interest in Tibetan culture and Buddhism started after reading Sogyal Rinpoche’s book, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, which helped him deal with death of a family member." Wangchen adds that Puyol "has a Tibetan tattoo on his left arm which reads 'Power is inside the Mind. More »
  • Swayed by the Movement of Mind Paid Member

    An ordinary person’s attention strays according to any movement of mind. Suddenly there is the confusion of believing in self and other, subject and object, and this situation goes on and on repeating itself endlessly. This is samsaric existence. The buddhas and bodhisattvas were successful in getting up on the dry land of enlightenment. But we sentient beings became bewildered, and are now in the unsuccessful, unsatisfactory state we all find ourselves in. We are still in the ocean of samsara; we have not yet gotten our heads fully out of the water. We have roamed about in one confused state of experience after the other, endlessly. At the same time, we haven’t lost our buddha nature. Our buddha nature is never separate from our minds for even a single instant. -Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche "Taking Your Future Into Your Own Hands" (Fall 2001) Read the complete article here. More »
  • Watch: Elizabeth Mattis-Namgyel on Empowerment Paid Member

    Teacher, scholar, and author Elizabeth Mattis-Namgyel speaks about the essential purpose of empowerment: to awaken our potential. She begins, Like all things on the Buddhist path, all the rituals, teachings, and practices have to do with awakening your Buddha potential, or clarity of mind.  The promise for all this is that we naturally have this wakeful mind but it gets obscured or confused. (continued) More »
  • Hothead? Cool your mind Paid Member

    Today the temperature in New York City is supposed to reach a sweltering 103 degrees. On the subway I watched as uncomfortable New Yorkers pushed past one another on the way from air-conditioned point A to air-conditioned point B with little regard for anyone else. Not only does the heat cause physical discomfort, it often turns us into hot heads—making us irritable and quick to anger. I myself find it hard to cool my mind when I can see the heat rising in waves from the pavement, so this morning I turned to the Tricycle archives for help. There I found "Hot and Heavy, Cool and Light," a piece on the Tibetan practice of tonglen by Judith Simmer-Brown: More »