Tibetan Buddhism

  • Today at Tricycle.com Paid Member

    It's a  busy day here at Tricycle! Here's what's new this Monday: Bonnie Myotai Treace's Tricycle Retreat, "Whole Life Offering," heads into its fourth and final week with the teaching, "Just One Small Bowl: The Boundless Body." You can visit her retreat here, and watch the first video of her retreat here. The first videos of Tricycle Retreats are always available to all. Next month's retreat will feature Allan Lokos, author of Pocket Peace. More »
  • Nine Types of Teachers Paid Member

    As I mentioned in a blog post last week, Ken McLeod has a talent for using precise language and creating formulas in his writing. This makes him good at creating lists. More »
  • The habits of happiness Paid Member

    Is Matthieu Ricard the happiest man in the world? Find out in the upcoming issue of Tricycle in which the French monk and former scientist discusses his most recent book Why Meditate?, the relationship between Buddhism and science, his feelings about being labeled "the happiest man in the world," and whether or not neurological advancements could one day be used to enhance happiness: Tricycle: If scientists could manipulate brain chemistry to make somebody happier, would this be beneficial? More »
  • Acharya Judy Lief on Gratitude Paid Member

    Every Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, a senior teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha’s 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa’s Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche’s commentaries on the lojong teachings. Each entry includes a practice. See the previous slogans and commentaries here. More »
  • Tibet's Gift to the Library of Congress, and Revelations from the 2008 Crackdown Paid Member

    Thanks to Danny Fisher for the heads-up on these two Tibet-related items. The first is cheerful, the second disturbing: TibetCustom.com: "The Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. More »
  • Thoughts on Buddhism and Prayer Paid Member

    I remember being very young and being given my first prayer wheel.  I wasn't given any explanation or  instruction aside from that it "had blessings in it" and that I was supposed to spin it clockwise.  I don't recall ever spinning the wheel for anything in particular, but I do remember spinning it like crazy, over and over, for years, "just because." Then, in about first grade, as I had been learning more and more from my classmates about this magical all-powerful fellow in the sky named God, who frankly, sounded a bit far-fetched to me, I was inevitably asked if I prayed.  My mind flashed to my countless hours with my prayer wheel, and for a second it seemed as if I had stumbled on to some common ground with my young Christian friends. I blurted out "Yes! I pray all the time!"  Then, however, I was asked, "Who do you pray to?" More »