Tibetan Buddhism

  • The Teacher-Student Relationship Paid Member

    I recently picked up Alexander Berzin's book Wise Teacher, Wise Student: Tibetan Approaches to a Healthy Relationship. The topic is a crucial one for Buddhism and one that has been much on my mind lately. I was familiar with Berzin's writing, and I knew this was one of his themes (he wrote a Tricycle article called "Practical Advice Regarding Spiritual Teachers" some time ago) but the new book seemed very familiar. More »
  • No better reality than the one we live in Paid Member

    "There is no better reality than the one we live in – where a good heart can be realized." - Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche Sasha Meyerowitz, photographer, writer, and devoted student of Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche, sends us this, from Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche, who is visiting the US this month.‎ For the details of Khyentse Rinpoche's visit, check out "Celebrating the Return" website here. For an earlier post on this site, click here. Below watch a video of Ani Pema Chodron discussing the visit. More »
  • Open Your Heart and Mind Completely Paid Member

    Today’s Daily Dharma: When we open our hearts and our minds completely, we are in a place where we can experience something new, a new truth, a new reality, a miracle that we haven’t experienced in the past. We can see things differently and they present new, expanded opportunities, new horizons. Therefore an open mind is required. This is true not only in relationship to the truth but in relationship to everyday life as well. -Anam Thubten, "How a Tomato Opened my Mind" (Fall 2009) Read the complete article here. Image ©Michael S. WertzToday’s Daily Dharma: More »
  • The Dalai Lama on "The Real Enemy" Paid Member

    Today’s Daily Dharma: When your mind is trained in self-discipline, even if you are surrounded by hostile forces, your peace of mind will hardly be disturbed. On the other hand, your mental peace and calm can easily be disrupted by your own negative thoughts and emotions. So I repeat, the real enemy is within, not outside. Usually we define our enemy as a person, an external agent, whom we believe is causing harm to us or to someone we hold dear. But such an enemy is relative and impermanent. One moment, the person may act as an enemy; at yet another moment, he or she may become your best friend. This is a truth that we often experience in our own lives. But negative thoughts and emotions, the inner enemy, will always remain the enemy. The Dalai Lama, "Loving the Enemy" (Summer 2002) More »
  • China's pollution worsens, prominent Tibetan conservationist arrested Paid Member

    Four years ago, China overtook the US to become the world's biggest emitter of carbon dioxide. Now International Energy Agency (IEA) has announced that China tops the list as the biggest energy consumer in the world. What does all this mean? Lots and lots of pollution. A report in yesterday's New York Times painted a dispiriting portrait of China's environmental problems: More »
  • Buddhist Teachers on Facebook Paid Member

    A 10-second history of the internet: First, there was a Big Bang (millions of individual little websites spewing out randomly into a vast virtual cosmos) followed by a Big Crunch (everybody slamming together onto social networking sites) then evolution (various websites fighting for survival and the top spot in a brutal Darwinian mess). In recent years, Facebook, having all but slain its feebler and shallower rival MySpace, has emerged the victor in this evolutionary struggle and now boasts over over 500,000,000 active users, about one eighth of the entire planet's population. More »