Tibetan Buddhism

  • The Monk's Tale: A Paris Review interview Paid Member

    Earlier this year, William Dalrymple of the The Paris Review interviewed Tibetan monk Tashi Passang: INTERVIEWER Can one be both a monk and a resistance fighter? TASHI PASSANG Once you have been a monk, it is very difficult to kill a man. But sometimes it can be your duty to do so. I knew that if I stayed in a monastery under the Chinese there was no point in being a monk. They wouldn’t let me practice my religion. So, to protect the ways of the Lord Buddha, the Buddhist dharma, I decided to fight. INTERVIEWER Isn’t nonviolence an essential aspect of being a monk? PASSANG Yes, nonviolence is the essence of the dharma. This is especially true for a monk. The most important thing is to love each and every sentient being. More »
  • Saturday with a three legged Buddha Paid Member

    One a recent sunny Saturday, a friend and I made the trip upstate to Storm King Art Center, an expansive sculpture park in Mountainville, NY. For years I'd heard about this impressive landscape, spotted with trees, ponds, and massive sculptures, but I was most excited about a new installation---Zhang Huan's Three Legged Buddha. Weighing 12 tons and towering at 28 feet, Three Legged Buddha does not travel easily, and it seems that Storm King is to be its final resting place. More »
  • Chinese Communist Party seeks to intensify reforms in Tibetan monasteries Paid Member

    VIA Phayul.com, Dharamsala, August 17: In what appeared to be a fresh effort to further tighten government’s control on Tibet's influential religious institutions, a top leader of the Communist Party of China has called for reforms in Buddhist monasteries by appointing monks and nuns who are "politically reliable". In a move that could be seen as part of Chinese Communist regime’s larger campaign to weed out pro-Dalai Lama elements in the Buddhist clergy, Du Qinglin, head of the United Front Work Department of the Party's Central Committee - the body tasked specifically to handle the Tibet talks - said greater efforts must be made to implement “democratic management in Tibetan Buddhist monasteries.” More »
  • When our spiritual journey begins Paid Member

    Only when we have a genuine, abiding desire to free ourselves from suffering and all its causes does our spiritual journey begin. That original desire is very potent and very real. It is the basis upon which we enter the path that will lead us to our goal. Yet from the point of view of the Vajrayana, or tantric, school of Buddhism, there is no place to go on that path, no end of the road where we will one day satisfy our thirst for liberty. Why? Because the very thing that we are looking for—freedom, wakefulness, enlightenment—is right here with us all the time. Adapted from a 2004 talk given by the Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche. To read the complete talk, visit Young Tibet Online. More »
  • Dalai Lama acknowledges independence movement growing stronger Paid Member

    The Dalai Lama has acknowledged that demands for outright independence for Tibet from China are growing stronger. The longer the situation remains unaddressed, he says, the likelier it is this trend will only continue, especially among young Tibetans. Sify News reports: Answering questions from his Chinese followers on Twitter, which he joined last month, the Dalai Lama said: "There are forces within our community such as the Tibetan Youth Congress who criticize our Middle Way policy and demand complete independence [for Tibet]. It seems their voices are growing stronger [these days]." More »
  • Video: Watching Dilgo Khyentse Yansgi Rinpoche grow up Paid Member

    Filmmaker Mark Elliott is making a movie about Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche and has been visiting him every three years. He takes time out on his fifth trip to talk about his work. Great footage of Khyentse Yangsi as a playful and fearless toddler and of his training as he approaches adulthood. More »