Tibetan Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    The Power of an Open Question - A Personal Koan Paid Member

    I have a personal koan.* "How do we live a life we can't hold on to?" How do we live with the fact that the moment we're born we move closer to death; when we fall in love we sign up for grief? How do we reconcile that gain always ends in loss; gathering, in separation? More »
  • This Buddhist Life Paid Member

  • More on mindfulness and technology Paid Member

    More from the New York Times on how the overuse of technology can be counterproductive: The technology makes the tiniest windows of time entertaining, and potentially productive. But scientists point to an unanticipated side effect: when people keep their brains busy with digital input, they are forfeiting downtime that could allow them to better learn and remember information, or come up with new ideas. Read the rest of “Digital Devices Deprive Brain of Needed Downtime.” In related news, the second Wisdom 2.0 Conference has been announced. From their website: There is little question that most of us will live "connected" to technology ... More »
  • The Power of an Open Question Paid Member

  • The Monk's Tale: A Paris Review interview Paid Member

    Earlier this year, William Dalrymple of the The Paris Review interviewed Tibetan monk Tashi Passang: INTERVIEWER Can one be both a monk and a resistance fighter? TASHI PASSANG Once you have been a monk, it is very difficult to kill a man. But sometimes it can be your duty to do so. I knew that if I stayed in a monastery under the Chinese there was no point in being a monk. They wouldn’t let me practice my religion. So, to protect the ways of the Lord Buddha, the Buddhist dharma, I decided to fight. INTERVIEWER Isn’t nonviolence an essential aspect of being a monk? PASSANG Yes, nonviolence is the essence of the dharma. This is especially true for a monk. The most important thing is to love each and every sentient being. More »
  • Saturday with a three legged Buddha Paid Member

    One a recent sunny Saturday, a friend and I made the trip upstate to Storm King Art Center, an expansive sculpture park in Mountainville, NY. For years I'd heard about this impressive landscape, spotted with trees, ponds, and massive sculptures, but I was most excited about a new installation---Zhang Huan's Three Legged Buddha. Weighing 12 tons and towering at 28 feet, Three Legged Buddha does not travel easily, and it seems that Storm King is to be its final resting place. More »