Tibetan Buddhism

  • The New Yorker Profiles The Dalai Lama Paid Member

    The current issue of The New Yorker features a lengthy profile of the Dalai Lama entitled "The Next Incarnation," written by Evan Osnos. After listening to a podcast with Osnos in which he talks about the piece and what it was like to meet the Dalai Lama, I had to go out and find a copy of the magazine so that I could read it (the online article is available only to subscribers). It's a solid profile overall and it concisely describes the Dalai Lama's current relationship with China. Osnos also does a good job of painting a picture of what Tibet looks like today. More »
  • Wake-up call: You don't have to do whatever your guru says Paid Member

    Buddhism's development in the West has sometimes been rocky, particularly with regard to teacher-student relationships. With decades of experience under his belt, Ken McLeod offers some sound advice in a 2002 interview: In the Vajrayana tradition it appears that you have to do whatever your guru says. But that’s absurd in this country. It just isn’t going to happen. America and most Western cultures are post-modern societies. They did away with the external structures that used to define role and position. Not so long ago, if your father was a shoemaker you would become one, and that sort of thing still prevails in a lot of places in the world. With modern education you have to figure out what you want to do — you have to develop the internal ability to define your own path. The same thing is true of marriage, economic position, education, political persuasion, and moral attitudes. More »
  • The Power of an Open Question - The Big Bang Paid Member

    From within the fluid and ineffable state of boundarylessness, the knowing mind experiences a stirring . . . a discomfort of sorts.  Somehow it's not enough to just rest in the boundaryless nature of this discomfort.  The knower of this discomfort then acts, and leaves the open state to become the doer, or "subject."  And what do subjects do? They define, seduce, wrestle with, and push away objects.  And this dynamic exchange between subject and object creates a whole lot of friction and heat, which activates a big bang of sorts . . . And the whole world of objectification bursts into action. More »
  • Steven Seagal to talk Buddhism on Vancouver Island Paid Member

    Steven Seagal is back in the Buddhist news stream after announcing that he will give a talk on Buddhism at the Tibetan Buddhist Temple in Coombs, the only Buddhist temple on Vancouver Island, on October 2. The Vancouver Sun has the story: While Seagal is well-known for a string of blockbuster action movies, including Above the Law and Under Siege, he is also revered as a holy man in the Buddhist religion and was recognized as a reincarnation, or 'Tulku', of the Buddhist Teacher Chungdrag Dorje by "His Holiness" Penor Rinpoche in 1997. Read the rest More »