Tibetan Buddhism

  • Yuthok Lane Paid Member

    This is how it will be:we will take a walk on concrete, not blue tiles, and you will pretend to be disappointed.This will have the quality of a ritual. In the morning, the sun will fall from the sky;we will protect ourselves against its fire.It is not so unbearable, but we have learnt to be wary of arrivals from the east. We are unbeautiful here;our stay in the plains has rendered us so.But whispers now carry endearments,and we will not have it any other way. More »
  • Turning Intention into Motivation Paid Member

    Framing our days between intention setting and joyful dedication, even once a week, can change how we live. It's a purposeful approach of self-awareness, conscious intention, and focused effort—three precious gifts of contemplative practice—by which we take responsibility for our thoughts and actions and take charge of our selves and our lives. As the Buddha put it, "You are your own enemy / and you are your own savior. " More »
  • Tibet 2.0 Paid Member

    Transcending TibetThrough April 12, 2015Rogue Space, New York Tserang Dhundrup's Gold iPhone sums up the contradictions of modern urban life in Lhasa. Organizing an art show around a geographic region or ethnic group is treacherous: it can easily result in a grouping of works that otherwise have nothing in common or, worse, reinforce unwanted stereotypes. Transcending Tibet—presented by the Trace Foundation in partnership with Arthub Asia—is alert to these dangers and does a good job of avoiding most of them. More »
  • The Progress Question Paid Member

    “I’ve been meditating for some time, but my mind seems just as chaotic and confused as when I started. Am I doing something wrong?” Almost everyone who practices meditation has similar concerns, no matter how long they’ve been doing it—whether three weeks, three years, or three decades. When students confront me with the progress question, I just try to redirect their attention. I’ve found that the best thing is for them to just keep practicing. More »
  • China Asserts Control over Dalai Lama Lineage Paid Member

    According to the Dalai Lama’s autobiography, Mao Zedong, the founder of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), once characterized religion as “poison.” The modern CCP maintains official atheism to this day, but that hasn’t stopped officials from claiming control over the intricacies of Tibetan Buddhist reincarnation. Angered by recent comments by the 14th Dalai Lama, 79, that he might not have a successor, Chinese officials have lashed out at the exiled spiritual leader and reasserted long-standing policies that grant them control over the recognition of reincarnate lamas. More »
  • Against “Common Sense” Buddhism Paid Member

    There’s an old story about a frog. He’s lived all his life in a well, and one day another frog appears at its rim. They get to talking, and the strange frog tells the older one that he’s come from somewhere called the ocean. “I never heard of that. I guess it’s about a quarter the size of my well?” “No. More than that,” answers the other. “OK—a half?” “Much bigger,” the strange frog laughs. “The same size, then?” “No, even bigger,” says the foreign frog. “Alright. This, I got to see,” says the oldster as he clambers out the well and sets out for the ocean. It’s a hard road, but at last he arrives. Unfortunately, when he sees the ocean, the shock is so great that it blows his mind and his head explodes. More »