Tibetan Buddhism

  • Stephen Colbert: The 15th Dalai Lama? Paid Member

    In 2007, Stephen Colbert, host of Comedy Central’s The Colbert Report, announced his run for President of the United States. Now, in the midst of this week’s media frenzy regarding the question of the 14th Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso's successor, Colbert dropped another bombshell on the Nation: he will be the 15th Dalai Lama. Finally, a successor that both Tibetans and China can agree on. On a more serious note, the media, at the least at first, got this story mostly wrong. Read our coverage here. More »
  • The End of the Dalai Lama? Paid Member

    The Dalai Lama's likely reaction to the current media frenzy. An interview with the 14th Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso by the Sunday edition of German paper Die Welt has caused quite a stir in the media and in Tibetan communities across the globe. More »
  • What's in a Word? Paid Member

    Terminology. Syntax. Diction. All words likely to send my mind wandering. And yet there I was, at the conference of 84000: Translating the Words of Buddha, in Bodhgaya, India, in a room full of high lamas and scholars who were convening to determine how to transmit Mahayana teachings to the world. It wasn’t just important. It was fascinating. More »
  • Monks in Ferguson Paid Member

    Tensions continued to escalate in Ferguson, Missouri over the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager shot and killed by a white police officer, Darren Wilson, on August 9. His death set off days of protests and a heavy-handed, militarized police response that has sparked national outrage. But Ferguson residents got a pleasant surprise on Sunday: A visit from a group of Tibetan Buddhist monks. “Ferguson was a very heated issue in our backyard,” explained Patty Maher, who is hosting the monks during their stay in St. Louis. “Sunday was their day off. . . . We didn't know what to expect, but they gladly went. And as you saw, their presence was profound.” More »
  • A Shamarpa without Borders Paid Member

    KATHMANDU, Nepal—It was the kind of ceremony that the honored guest seemed to be directing from the Beyond: thousands of students and admirers, from peons to a Nepalese government minister, converging on a half-built monastery to attend the traditional cremation rite of a vajra master that, even in death, stirred up an international fuss. They came to honor the 14th Shamar Rinpoche, Mipham Chokyi Lodro (1952–2014), a spiritual force who understood that staying true to his calling as the second-highest ranking lama of the Karma Kagyu order wouldn't win him any dharmic popularity contests. To many, he was a polarizing figure, an uncompromising traditionalist. More »