thich nhat hanh

  • This week on tricycle.com Paid Member

    If you were asked to imagine yourself meditating, what would you look like? For many of us the picture that springs to mind is a seated figure, cross-legged on a cushion. But there are many ways to meditate. This week on tricycle.com we are featuring a practice piece on walking meditation by Thich Nhat Hanh. He writes, "You can take a step and touch the earth in such a way that you establish yourself in the present moment; you will arrive in the here and the now." More »
  • Zen Sinners, Zen Saints: Tricycle Responds Paid Member

    The longtime Zen practitioner and writer Stuart Lachs recently criticized Tricycle for what he considers the magazine’s participation in the long tradition of Zen hagiography (see “When the Saints Go Marching In”). To support his argument, Lachs cites two articles Tricycle published, “Down East Roshi” (2009), about Walter Nowick, and “The Wanderer” (2008), an excerpt from Sheng Yen’s autobiography, Footprints in the Snow. More »
  • Peace Begins on Our Plates Paid Member

    People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has released an ad featuring a Thich Nhat Hanh teaching: I am determined not to kill, not to let others kill, and not to support any act of killing in the world. We've run stories about animal rights in the past and have had lively discussion about the ethics of pet euthanasia, but it's not often that we've addressed strict veganism. Sam Mowe (you may know him on Twitter as "Tricycle Sam") has written about it here, though, and it always inspires debate—healthy debate. Take a look here and here. More »
  • Notes from the 2010 World Buddhist Conference in Malaysia Paid Member

    Gary Gach, resident spirit of Tricycle's Haiku Corner, reports from the 2010 World Buddhist Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malysia: More »
  • Labor Day Special: The disease of capitalism? Paid Member

    In an August 26 post, I noted 5 recent comments from Thich Nhat Hanh on the occasion of his visit to the UK. One of the quotes refers to "the disease of capitalism" (Thay's words), and I thought perhaps some would object. No one did. One, did, however, find that phrase particularly felicitous. Seedoubleyou writes: Thay’s messages are fantastic, particularly in relation to the poison of capitalism. I remain hopeful that his words stretch beyond Buddhist circles and to the ears that need to hear. In the Guardian today, the question is posed: More »