thich nhat hanh

  • Buddha Buzz: Buddhism, Self-Help, and Suicide Paid Member

    Some of us Buddhists, myself included, like to decry Buddhism being used as self-help or therapy. And yet, Buddhism has become so entwined with self-help that in New York Magazine's recent self-help issue, half of the six feature articles mention Buddhism in some way. Kathryn Schulz's piece "The Self in Self-Help," accurately summarizes the whole phenomenon in just one sentence: "Curiously, Buddhism is simultaneously a burgeoning influence on the Western self-help movement and entirely at odds with it: anti-self, and anti-help." More »
  • Mindfulness in the Garden: Zen Tools for Digging in the Dirt Paid Member

    Mindfulness in the Garden: Zen Tools for Digging in the Dirt is a new book from Parallax Press by landscape architect and author Zachiah Murray, with a foreword by Thich Nhat Hanh. Predicated upon the Zen conviction that the garden is a perfect place to practice mindfulness, the book offers a series simple short verses, called gathas, to assist us in cultivating deep awareness through the practice of gardening. The following excerpt begins the book. Entering the Garden Entering the gardenI see my true nature.In its reflectionmy heart is at peace. We cross many thresholds in our lives. Some thresholds are monumental—being born, learning to walk, starting school, graduating, getting our first job, losing our first job, getting married, giving birth, and dying. Other thresholds are subtle—moving from one room to another, passing through a gate, or crossing an intersection. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: stories, stories, and more stories Paid Member

    In a recent piece for The Telegraph, Tim Stanley wrote about his time in Hollywood. The article itself isn't particularly enlightening, but he did say something about Buddhism and personal narratives that I thought was worth noting: More »
  • BuddhaFest: Colors of Compassion starts today! Paid Member

    Week 2 of the Tricycle BuddhaFest Online Film Festival starts today with Colors of Compassion, a "cinematic retreat" that documents the first retreat for people of color given by Vietnamese Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh. While the retreat was for people of color, many of the issues shared are universal. Thich Nhat Hanh tells us that by realizing the truth of "interbeing" we can arrive at our "true home." The film was shot at Deer Park Monastery over a period of four days in 2004. To watch an interview with the director of Colors of Compassion, Eloise de Leon, click here. More »
  • This week on Paid Member

    If you were asked to imagine yourself meditating, what would you look like? For many of us the picture that springs to mind is a seated figure, cross-legged on a cushion. But there are many ways to meditate. This week on we are featuring a practice piece on walking meditation by Thich Nhat Hanh. He writes, "You can take a step and touch the earth in such a way that you establish yourself in the present moment; you will arrive in the here and the now." More »
  • Zen Sinners, Zen Saints: Tricycle Responds Paid Member

    The longtime Zen practitioner and writer Stuart Lachs recently criticized Tricycle for what he considers the magazine’s participation in the long tradition of Zen hagiography (see “When the Saints Go Marching In”). To support his argument, Lachs cites two articles Tricycle published, “Down East Roshi” (2009), about Walter Nowick, and “The Wanderer” (2008), an excerpt from Sheng Yen’s autobiography, Footprints in the Snow. More »