Theravada

  • Enlightenment is the Three Poisons Paid Member

    James Shaheen and I got to spend some time with Bernie Glassman this weekend at Upaya Zen Center in Santa Fe. He is extremely charismatic, bursting with warm-hearted humor, and fond of jokes. I had recently been glancing through the book The Hazy Moon of Enlightenment and wondered if the sterner "Tetsugen Glassman Sensei" of the 1970s felt like another life to him now. His answer was yes and no, but mostly no. More »
  • Week 3 of Larry Rosenberg's Tricycle Retreat Paid Member

    We're entering the third week of Larry Rosenberg's Tricycle Retreat, "The Challenge of Change." This week's teaching is "The Buddha and the Shrimper (Part 2)." You need to be a Tricycle Community Sustaining Member to watch the full video, but you can watch the video here: http://vimeo.com/15841420 The best part of any Tricycle Retreat is the discussion with the teacher. Join the discussion with Larry Rosenberg by becoming a Tricycle Community Sustaining Member today! You'll enjoy access to this Tricycle Retreat—and all the Tricycle Retreats! More »
  • Ask Sharon Salzberg about meditation Paid Member

    Interested in meditation? Tricycle.com/meditate is a great place to go to find out more. Learn to work with aversion, with metta (lovingkindness), and practice with the breath, the body, emotions, and thoughts. This page is part of Tricycle's 28-day meditation challenge, Commit to Sit: Go on retreat without leaving home! Best of all, on Thursday, October 21st, from 4 to 5 PM Eastern, renowned Vipassana teacher Sharon Salzberg will be answering your questions, live on Twitter! Looking for tips? Confused about the jhanas? All mixed up about samadhi? Or just having trouble counting the breaths? Sharon knows all (or very close.) You can find her here: @sharonsalzberg More »
  • Larry Rosenberg: The Challenge of Change Paid Member

    Larry Rosenberg is the founder and a guiding teacher at Cambridge Insight Meditation Center. He is also a senior teacher at the Insight Meditation Society in Barre, Massachusetts and the author of Breath by Breath - The Liberating Practice of Insight Meditation and, more recently, Living in the Light of Death - On the Art of Being Fully Alive. His writings have appeared frequently in the pages of Tricycle. In a 1999 interview with Tricycle editor Amy Gross, Larry discusses vipassana meditation as he sees it: More »
  • Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, and Arahants Paid Member

    Who better than the Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi to discuss the competing Buddhist ideals of the arahant and the bodhisattva? Bhikkhu Bodhi has been trained in both the Mahayana and Theravada traditions and is one of the most respected and, um, thorough Buddhist scholars around. His paper "Arahants, Bodhisattvas, and Buddhas" appears on Access to Insight. The introduction is reproduced below, but it's worth reading in full on ATI. Among other interesting points, he discusses what distinguishes the Buddha from other arahants, and describes the emergence of the Mahayana from a proto bodhisattva-yana. The arahant ideal and the bodhisattva ideal are often considered the respective guiding ideals of Theravāda Buddhism and Mahāyāna Buddhism. This assumption is not entirely correct, for the Theravāda tradition has absorbed the bodhisattva ideal into its framework and thus recognizes the validity of both arahantship and Buddhahood as objects of aspiration. It would therefore be more accurate to say that the arahant ideal and the bodhisattva ideal are the respective guiding ideals of Early Buddhism and Mahāyāna Buddhism. By "Early Buddhism" I do not mean the same thing as Theravāda Buddhism that exists in the countries of southern Asia. I mean the type of Buddhism embodied in the archaic Nikāyas of Theravāda Buddhism and in the corresponding texts of other schools of Indian Buddhism that did not survive the general destruction of Buddhism in India. It is important to recognize that these ideals, in the forms that they have come down to us, originate from different bodies of literature stemming from different periods in the historical development of Buddhism. If we don't take this fact into account and simply compare these two ideals as described in Buddhist canonical texts, we might assume that the two were originally expounded by the historical Buddha himself, and we might then suppose that the Buddha — living and teaching in the Ganges plain in the 5th century B.C. — offered his followers a choice between them, as if to say: "This is the arahant ideal, which has such and such features; and that is the bodhisattva ideal, which has such and such features. Choose whichever one you like." The Mahāyāna sūtras, such as the Mahāprajñā-pāramitā Sūtra and the Saddharmapuṇḍarīka Sūtra (the Lotus Sūtra), give the impression that the Buddha did teach both ideals. Such sūtras, however, certainly are not archaic. To the contrary, they are relatively late attempts to schematize the different types of Buddhist practice that had evolved over a period of roughly four hundred years after the Buddha's parinirvāṇa. More »