Theravada

  • The Lion's Roar - Daily Dharma, September 24th, 2009 Paid Member

    We each need to make our lion’s roar—to persevere with unshakable courage when faced with all manner of doubts and sorrows and fears—to declare our right to awaken. We need to take the one seat, as the Buddha did, and completely face what is true about this life. Make no mistake about this, it is not easy. It can take the courage of a lion or a lioness, especially when we are asked to sit with the depth of our pain or fear. –Jack Kornfield, from “Take the One Seat,” Tricycle, Summer 1993 Read the complete article. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Don't be afraid of pain Paid Member

    Sometimes I think anticipation of pain is far worse than the pain itself. That's not to diminish the reality of pain, but it's a fact that we've all got to deal with it so why not find a way to be with it? It goes against the grain, but Buddhists have traditionally seen in pain an opportunity for practice. (Granted, this was before the Fentanyl patch.) Not for everyone, but for those it does work for, it makes plenty of good sense. Try it next time you've got a toothache on the weekend. Read Upasika Kee Nanayon's "Tough Teachings to Ease the Mind" here. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Everyday Insights Paid Member

    Laypeople live in the realm of sensuality. They have families, money, and possessions, and are deeply involved in all sorts of activities. Yet sometimes they will gain insight and see dharma before monks and nuns do. Why is this? It’s because of their suffering from all these things. They see the fault and can let go. They can put it down after seeing clearly in their experience. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Is this Buddhist monk the world's oldest man? Paid Member

    Keep sitting: it might make you live longer. Thai monk Luang Phu Supha is celebrating his birthday today—his 115th birthday, he says, but this is up for debate. His birth certificate says 1896, but he believes he was two years old at the time. A 113-year-old American, Walter Bruening, also lays claim to the title of world's oldest man. Luang Phu Supha lives at the temple on Phuket where he is abbot. The site is, appropriately enough, named after him. The monks now intend to invite Guinness records representatives to verify their abbot's claim. He puts his longevity down to eating less, speaking less and always speaking the truth. More »
  • The path doesn’t save all its pleasure for the end. You can enjoy it now. Paid Member

    When explaining meditation, the Buddha often drew analogies with the skills of artists, carpenters, musicians, archers, and cooks. Finding the right level of effort, he said, is like a musician’s tuning of a lute. Reading the mind’s needs in the moment—to be gladdened, steadied, or inspired—is like a palace cook’s ability to read and please the tastes of a prince. Thai forest monk Thanissaro Bhikkhu teaches the joy of effort by explaining that "the path doesn’t save all its pleasure for the end. You can enjoy it now." Read the rest here. [Image: Explosions in the Sky, David Poppie, 2007, mixed-media collage, 24 x 24 in.] More »
  • Realization through one's own effort Paid Member

    Laypeople live in the realm of sensuality. They have families, money, and possessions, and are deeply involved in all sorts of activities. Yet sometimes they will gain insight and see dharma before monks and nuns do. Why is this? Well, why? Read Ajahn Chah's "Meeting the Dharma Alone" here. More »