Theravada

  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Same as it ever was Paid Member

    Rapid technological advances. Increased wealth. Stress. Stable lives and careers come under the pressure of accelerating change. The twenty-first century? No, the sixth century B.C.E.—a time of destructive warfare, economic dislocation, and widespread disruption of established patterns of life, just like today. In conditions similar to ours, the Buddha discovered a path to lasting happiness. His discovery—a step-by-step method of mental training to achieve contentment—is as relevant today as ever. Putting the Buddha’s discovery into practice is no quick fix. It can take years. The most important qualification at the beginning is a strong desire to change your life by adopting new habits and learning to see the world anew. - Bhante Henepola Gunaratana from "Getting Started ," Tricycle, Fall 2001 More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    What Really Matters Paid Member

    The Buddha refused to deal with those things that don’t lead to the extinction of dukkha (suffering.) He didn’t discuss them. Take the question of whether or not there is rebirth after death. What is reborn? How is it reborn? What is its “karmic inheritance”? These questions don’t aim at the extinction of dukkha. That being so, they are not the Buddha’s teaching nor are they connected with it. They don’t lie within the range of Buddhism. Also, the one who asks about such matters has no choice but to believe indiscriminately any answer that’s given, because the one who answers won’t be able to produce any proofs and will just be speaking according to his own memory and feeling. The listener can’t see for himself and consequently must blindly believe the other’s words. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Three Kinds of Anger Paid Member

    Need anger management? Who doesn't? More »
  • The Lion's Roar - Daily Dharma, September 24th, 2009 Paid Member

    We each need to make our lion’s roar—to persevere with unshakable courage when faced with all manner of doubts and sorrows and fears—to declare our right to awaken. We need to take the one seat, as the Buddha did, and completely face what is true about this life. Make no mistake about this, it is not easy. It can take the courage of a lion or a lioness, especially when we are asked to sit with the depth of our pain or fear. –Jack Kornfield, from “Take the One Seat,” Tricycle, Summer 1993 Read the complete article. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Don't be afraid of pain Paid Member

    Sometimes I think anticipation of pain is far worse than the pain itself. That's not to diminish the reality of pain, but it's a fact that we've all got to deal with it so why not find a way to be with it? It goes against the grain, but Buddhists have traditionally seen in pain an opportunity for practice. (Granted, this was before the Fentanyl patch.) Not for everyone, but for those it does work for, it makes plenty of good sense. Try it next time you've got a toothache on the weekend. Read Upasika Kee Nanayon's "Tough Teachings to Ease the Mind" here. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Everyday Insights Paid Member

    Laypeople live in the realm of sensuality. They have families, money, and possessions, and are deeply involved in all sorts of activities. Yet sometimes they will gain insight and see dharma before monks and nuns do. Why is this? It’s because of their suffering from all these things. They see the fault and can let go. They can put it down after seeing clearly in their experience. More »