Thailand

  • Mindfulness & Murder: A monastic mystery Paid Member

    Who dunnit? That's what Father Ananda, a cop-turned-Buddhist-monk, is trying to figure out in Irish-Thai director Tom Waller's new film Mindfulness and Murder (Sop Mai Ngib in Thai). From the Bangkok Post: Adapted for the screen and directed by Tom Waller, an Irish-Thai producer/filmmaker, the film is adding a new shelf in the menagerie of monk characters in Thai movies. Though not exactly a mind-twisting detective flick of the highest order, the film rides on a moody atmosphere, while its portrayal of the cloistered monastic existence—in good and bad ways—is honest and far from simply flattering. More »
  • Fake Monks and Buddha Thievery Paid Member

    Has anybody read the Bangkok Post lately? Seems like the paper is absolutely determined to expose all Buddhist fraud and thievery these days. First, in "Bogus Monks exploit Buddhism," we learn of foreign monks immigrating to Thailand in order to illegally ordain as monks and beg residents for alms. The Post reports: More »
  • Thousands gather for cremation of Luangta Maha Bua Paid Member

    We noted the passing of eminent Thai Forest monk Maha Bua (also anglicized Boowa) in January. A few days ago his remains were created at his forest temple, Wat Pa Ban Tad. Devotees came from far and wide in the hopes of collecting some of the monk's ashes. Soldiers guarded the crematorium itslef, presumably to keep it from being overrun. The crowd is reported by the Bangkok Post to be in the thousands, while Thailand's The Nation numbered the crowd in the tens of thousands. More »
  • The passing of Venerable Acariya Maha Boowa Paid Member

    This weekend word arrived of the passing of one of Thailand's most prominent monks, the Venerable Acariya Maha Boowa (or Bua) Ñanasampanno, also known as Luangta Boowa. Widely recognized as an arahant, or fully realized master, Maha Boowa was one of the last surviving students of the Venerable Acariya Mun Bhuridatta, who is credited with establishing the Thai Forest tradition, which has since spread across the globe. The Ven. Maha Boowa was known for his work helping the poor of Thailand through his temple Wat Pa Ban Tat. More »
  • The 5 Rewards of Listening to the Dhamma Paid Member

    “There are these five rewards in listening to the Dhamma. Which five? “[1] One hears what one has not heard before.[2] One clarifies what one has heard before. [3] One gets rid of doubt. [4] One’s views are made straight. [5] One’s mind grows serene. “These are the five rewards in listening to the Dhamma.” — Anguttara Nikaya 5:202 - quoted in Skill in Questions by Thanissaro Bhikkhu In January, to accompany Thanissaro Bhikkhu's Tricycle Retreat The Ten Perfections, now in its third week, we'll be offering Skill in Questions for download. We are offering this special e-book edition for free. More »
  • Answering The Questioner's Needs Paid Member

    In his book Skill in Questions, Thai forest monk Thanissaro Bhikkhu describes the Buddha's skill in answering the needs of each questioner: More »