Science

  • Buddhism for Humanists Paid Member

    Over at The New Humanism (TNH), a publication of the Humanist Chaplaincy at Harvard, there is a special issue dedicated to Secular Buddhism, featuring, among others—and not surprisingly—Tricycle contributing editor Stephen Batchelor, author of the recently published Confession of a Buddhist Atheist. In "No Future in a Parrot's Egg: Digging into the Humanist Heart of Buddhism" Batchelor writes, More »
  • Meditators have more brains Paid Member

    Psychology Today reports on a study that indicates that meditators have more gray matter where it counts: A study published in NeuroImage presents findings by a group of researchers at UCLA who used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to scan the brains of meditators. The researchers report having found differences between the scans, showing that certain brain areas of the long-term meditator group were larger than those of the non-meditating control group. More »
  • Nalanda Benefit Paid Member

    If you’re in the neighborhood Wednesday evening (June 9)—and the interface of Buddhism and psychotherapy is your thing—Nalanda Institute for Contemplative Science is hosting a panel discussion, “The Confluence of Two Streams: Buddhist Psychotherapy in the West,” at Tibet House in New York City. Participating are Nalanda’s founder and director, psychiatrist Joe Loizzo, and two other big names in the field, Paul Fulton, PhD, president of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy, and psychoanalyst Jeffrey Rubin, PhD, author of Psychotherapy and Buddhism. The conversation should be lively: moderating is Robert Thurman, the charismatic Columbia professor and president of Tibet House US. More »
  • 5 Day Buddhist Monk Diet? It works. Paid Member

    Here's what we read at Environmental Health News: People who adopted a vegetarian diet for just five days show reduced levels of toxic chemicals in their bodies. In particular, levels of hormone disrupting chemicals and antibiotics used in livestock were lower after the five-day vegetarian program. The pilot study suggests that people may be able reduce their exposure to potentially dangerous chemicals through dietary choices, such as limiting consumption of animal products like meats and dairy. And whose diet did they follow? Twenty-five participants lived in a Buddhist temple and adopted the monks' lifestyle – including their traditional vegetarian diet – for five days. More »
  • The World Without Us Paid Member

    I came across an Elephant Journal tweet that took me to this, by Jay Winston: Hell, pumping every kind of toxin into our ground, air, and water while carelessly wasting every natural resource we can find is perhaps the single most defining characteristic of human society. Nonetheless, in big-picture terms, our total effect on Mother Earth really hasn’t amounted to anything more serious than a bad case of planetary eczema or psoriasis. And, the way things are going, we won’t be bothering her for long. More »
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    Cyborg Buddha: Is what we are born with enough or could we use a little help? Paid Member

    Suzuki Roshi once said something to the effect of, "You're perfect as you are—and you could use a little work." Transhumanist, bioethicist, and former Buddhist monk James Hughes would agree. And that's an understatement: there's virtually nothing about us, he thinks, that can't be enhanced to improve our chances at realization: More »