Science

  • "The Known Universe" by AMNH/RMA Paid Member

    I just can't get enough of this video. Created by the American Museum of Natural History and used in the recent Rubin Museum of Art exhibition "Visions of the Cosmos", it is a journey from the Himalayas to the end of the universe, literally.  If you haven't seen it, it is definitely worth the six and half minutes it takes to watch it. Watch it here. More »
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    Survival of the Kindest Paid Member

    It's not such a dog-eat-dog after all. It turns out we may be wired to be kind. As you may have heard, Sharon Salzberg is leading our first Tricycle Online Retreat, a three-week teaching on metta, or loving-kindness, practice. In the teacher-led discussion, one retreatant points us to a University of California, Berkeley, study on sympathy and compassion. More »
  • Shelter from the Storm Paid Member

    [UPDATED: Link fixed.] "The storm petrel is able to survive only by taking refuge in the vast ocean that surrounds it. Rather than allowing themselves to become overwhelmed by the enormity of their environment, these fragile and diminutive birds follow the paths of least resistance. During the worst weather, they place themselves deep down in the troughs of waves, using their delicate feet to push themselves away from the moving walls of wild water next to them, and letting the howling winds shear across the crests of waves high above. This is the bird's own spontaneous dance of resourcefulness and survival, and it is only one example of the countless ways in which sentient beings take refuge." - Gary Thorp, "Shelter from the Storm." Read the complete article here. More »
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    Daily Dharma: Does Compassion Come Naturally? Paid Member

    Q: Doesn’t it come to us naturally that it’s in our self-interest to extend compassion to those beyond our local groups? A: No, it doesn't. Because to worry about what some disenchanted Muslim teenager in Pakistan is feeling right now does not come naturally in the sense of visceral response. It does, however, make intellectual sense; the world is moving to a point where, if only out of self-interest, we need to think about that person. One virtue of some of the religious traditions is that they have well-worked-out procedures for assisting this intellectual process. In other words, it's one thing to realize logically that my fate is intertwined with the fate of Muslims around the world: If they're unhappy, they'll eventually make me unhappy. But it's another to feel it, to look at someone and get a deep sense of fraternity with them. That's where religious practice plays an important role. More »
  • Can Buddhism Save the Planet? Paid Member

    Can a bodhisattva vow for the earth help to halt or reverse manmade climate change? Two articles make the case for the dharma helping us restore balance to the planet. How? It starts within each of us: In the Bangkok Post, Chompoo Trakullertsathien says that as the world heats up, so do our minds. Cooling our anger, greed, and delusions can't help but lead to good things for the earth. John Guerrerio writes that the current environmental crisis offers us a chance to overcome our dualistic view of Economy vs. More »
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    We're All Wired to Be Seekers Paid Member

    Ever find yourself using the internet to look up one edifying fact—and not emerging from an exhausting round of follow-the-link until hours later? You're not alone. Dopamine may be to blame, or, as University of Michigan professor of psychology Kent Berridge says, wanting: Our brains are designed to more easily be stimulated than satisfied. "The brain seems to be more stingy with mechanisms for pleasure than for desire," Berridge has said. This makes evolutionary sense. Creatures that lack motivation, that find it easy to slip into oblivious rapture, are likely to lead short (if happy) lives. So nature imbued us with an unquenchable drive to discover, to explore. Stanford University neuroscientist Brian Knutson has been putting people in MRI scanners and looking inside their brains as they play an investing game. More »