Science

  • How did Buddhism get the brain right? Paid Member

    David Weisman writes in SEED Magazine: More »
  • Wisdom 2.0 livestream begins today! Paid Member

    Can't make it to the Bay Area for this weekend's Wisdom 2.0 conference? No shirt, no shoes, no problem: You can watch the event live here. The Wisdom 2.0 Conference is a one-of-a-kind event that launched in Silicon Valley end of April, 2010, and brought together people from a variety of disciplines, including technology leaders, Zen teachers, neuroscientists, and academics to explore how we can live with deeper meaning and wisdom in our technology-rich age. The conference addresses the great challenge of our age: to not only live connected to one another through technology, but to do so in ways that are beneficial to our own well-being, effective in our work, and useful to the world. More conferences like it are currently in development. More »
  • Wisdom 2.0 NYC! December 11th at UrbanZen Paid Member

    This Saturday, December 11th, 2011, from 10 AM to 7 PM, there will be a unique event at UrbanZen in New York City. Tricycle is pleased to co-sponsor this Wisdom 2.0 event that explores living with presence and purpose in our modern technology-rich age. With all the new technology today, it's easier than ever to live "disconnectedly connected," where we are connected to others through technology but largely disconnected from ourselves. The tools easily become our masters instead of our servants. More »
  • Empathy or Compassion? Reflections on the Compassion Meditation Conference Paid Member

    Last week in Atlanta, Buddhist scholars and researchers in psychology, psychiatry, and neuroscience congregated alongside His Holiness the Dalai Lama for Emory University’s Conference on Compassion Meditation.  The conference explored several of the many methods for constructively dealing with destructive emotions that Buddhism offers.  HHDL contended that these negativity-reducing methods could be practiced in a secular context by Buddhists and non-Buddhists alike. During the conference, participants from different fields presented convincing research demonstrating the benefits of compassion meditation among a variety of non-Buddhist populations. More »
  • Make your next Facebook status: "Just meditated to ensure that I care about all you people." Paid Member

    A recent study, conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, has found that college students today are 40 percent less empathetic than they were in 1979, with the steepest decline coming in the last 10 years. From Keith O'Brien at the Boston Globe, “The empathy deficit: Even as they become more connected, young people are caring less about others”: Perhaps more than any other characteristic, one’s capacity for empathic concern dictates how much one cares about others. Those who score high in empathic concern, according to past research, are more likely to return incorrect change to a cashier, let someone else ahead of them in line, carry a stranger’s belongings, give money to a homeless person, volunteer, donate to a charity, look after a friend’s pet or plant, or even live on a vegetarian diet. And what’s alarming, Konrath said, is that empathic concern has fallen more than any other aspect of empathy. Between 1979 and 2009, according to the new research, empathic concern dropped 48 percent. The results have led to the obvious follow-up questions: What cultural changes may have shaped children in the 1980s and ’90s, giving rise to a less empathetic generation? Why do we care less? And is there any way we can reverse the trend? Read the rest of “The empathy deficit” here. Although they don’t mention this in this article, other recent studies suggest that meditation works as a way to reverse this trend. This from a 2008 msnbc.com article “Neuroscience may explain the Dalai Lama: A new study reveals that meditation may increase empathy, benevolence”: More »