Science

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    What will the 21st century taste like? Paid Member

    According to Momofuku chef David Chang, it will taste like veggies: At the table, this means our plates will be heavier on grains and greens, and meat will shift from the center of the dish to a supporting role--the role it's played throughout history in most of the world's cuisines. More »
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    Monks in Korea Stick up for Disgraced Scientist Paid Member

    But why? South Korea's Buddhist monks have urged the government to allow disgraced scientist Hwang Woo-suk to continue his stem cell research. "It is deplorable that research by Hwang Woo-suk and his team is suppressed unreasonably," the monks said in a resolution. "The government should approve the research in order to save a greater soul." The resolution came ahead of the Health Ministry's decision Saturday over whether to approve Hwang's request to restart his work. Hwang, once considered a national hero, has been on trial for alleged fraud and violation of bioethics laws after his team was found in January 2006 to have fabricated results to claim success in his study. More »
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    From Salon Paid Member

    Andy Cooper flagged two Salon articles that may be of interest. Dalai Lama's time bomb ponders the Dalai Lama's policy of nonviolent activism in the face of widespread frustration among many Tibetans. And physicist/theologian Karl Giberson asks science and religion, Can't we just all get along? More »
  • Burmese Still Lack Aid Paid Member

    A month after the storm, hundred of thousands of Burmese still have received no aid. Moe than 69,000 people have died in the earthquake in China's Sichuan province, and because many of the survivors did not have insurance (or the right kind of insurance) they're finding themselves out in the cold. And more on incense being bad for your lungs. More »
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    Death and Cookies Paid Member

    Aging, illness, and death are inevitable. Many Buddhists deal with this truth by meditating and contemplating such concepts as emptiness, impermanence, and interconnectedness. Another way people often handle thoughts of these pillars of suffering? Delicious cookies. In a study published in New Scientist , participants with low self-esteem who were assigned to ponder their own deaths ate more cookies (thoughts of death had little impact on those with high self-esteem). Ruminations of mortality also inclined them to spend more money. "When you indulge in shopping or eating, it helps you forget yourself," notes Dirk "Captain Obvious" Smeesters of Erasmus University in Rotterdam. More »
  • After the Quake, Fingers Point at Beijing Paid Member

    An estimated 10,000 children died in the earthquake in Sichuan province in China, and aftershocks are still echoing through the region. In one school with 900 children near the epicenter, only 13 students emerged alive. Parents have become angry at the shoddy construction used in China's school and in the government's reaction in general. And now rivers that have been dammed by debris from the quake and turned into growing lakes threaten many more people. The Burmese government and their media is softening their stance toward allowing aid donors into affected areas. More »