Random Notes

  • The Ethics of Farming Animals Paid Member

    The way I see it, there are two ways to think about the ethics of meat eating. One is to look at the suffering of each individual animal that is killed for consumption. The other way is to take a global approach, where one is concerned with negative environmental/human consequences caused by the meat industry. Of course, you don't have to choose one over the other, it just seems worthwhile to make a distinction. With this distinction in mind I'd like to call attention to a recent piece by George Monbiot in The Guardian that argues that much of the human malnutrition connected to the meat industry could be alleviated most effectively by changing the system in which animals are farmed. The author, a longtime proponent of veganism, had some of his assumptions challenged by the book Meat: A Benign Extravagance by Simon Fairlie. From "I was wrong about veganism. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    The price of happiness? $75,000 Paid Member

  • A Cat Watches Over the Buddha Paid Member

    Curiosity fulfilled the cat. This picture comes our way from photographer Gordon Ball. Image: © Gordon Ball More »
  • 25% of Americans believe in reincarnation Paid Member

    In "Remembrances of Lives Past," an article that appeared in the New York Times this weekend, Newsweek's religion editor Lisa Miller takes a look at our nation's growing belief in reincarnation. According to data released by Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, a quarter of Americans believe in reincarnation (interestingly, according to the Times piece, women are more likely to believe in reincarnation than men, and democrats are more likely to believe than republicans). This emerging belief in reincarnation is a steep departure from the traditional Judaeo-Christian narrative that most Americans are familiar with: More »
  • The Biggest Book in the World Paid Member

    If you spent your summer rifling through cheap paperbacks and you're ready for something more substantial here's a recommendation: the biggest book in the world. Measuring 5 x 7 feet and weighing 133 pounds, The Bhutan: A Visual Odyssey Across the Last Himalayan Kingdom is officially recognized as the largest book in the world by Guinness World Records. Created by Michael Hawley and composed of gigantic photographs of Bhutan, the book is printed only on demand and it takes a roll of paper longer than a football field, more than a gallon of ink, and 24 hours of press time to produce a single copy. More »