Random Notes

  • Tricycle Community 8 comments

    A picture and a thousand words Paid Member

    Just picked this up from a raft, who suggests this for the more "visually minded," and floated it over here: Click on it to enlarge. It pretty much sums it up—Buddhism in a nutshell! From a raft (Ashin Sopāka): "This was sent to me, so the source cannot be properly attributed, but it appears it was created by 'S Chinawaro Bhikkhu.'" More »
  • Dudeism=Buddhism? Paid Member

    What is Dudeism? According to dudeism.com, a website dedicated to deploying the wisdom of The Dude (Jeff Bridges) from the comedy The Big Lebowski, Dudeism is a religion with the following creed: The idea is this: Life is short and complicated and nobody knows what to do about it. So don’t do anything about it. Just take it easy, man. Stop worrying so much whether you’ll make it into the finals. Kick back with some friends and some oat soda and whether you roll strikes or gutters, do your best to be true to yourself and others – that is to say, abide. In short, Dudeism is not Buddhism. More »
  • Tricycle Community 20 comments

    Meditation, hold the Buddhism, toss the baby Paid Member

    A lot of people are ditching Buddhism and teaching meditation, and their students may scarcely know that the mindfulness meditation they're practicing was taught by the Buddha. The Guardian's Ed Halliwell writes: So what happens when Buddhism meets our secular world? Whereas some students of Asian emigre teachers in the 60s and 70s appeared spellbound, wide-eyed with enchantment at exciting foreign rituals, many western teachers have moved on – Jack Kornfield recently explained that "more and more, we're teaching meditation not as a religious activity, but as a support for living a wise, healthy and compassionate inner life". More »
  • What can this mean? Paid Member

    Trike designer Frank Olinsky asks: Secret vajrayana teaching? More »
  • "Abbey Dharma" on Politics: Respect Others' Opinions Paid Member

    I think that calling oneself a Buddhist implies a dedication to non-greed, non-hatred, and non-delusion—a dedication that certainly transcends political stance. It would be wonderful if our sanghas welcomed political diversity and used practices of skillful speech to explain our opinions to one another. In situations that do not feel combative to me, I can work collegially. I can modify my position to accommodate others. I can recognize situations in which an attachment to a particular view has kept me from realizing a larger truth. What if we, as Buddhists in communities, were a model for the world political community? Sylvia Boorstein, "Dear Abbey Dharma" (Summer 2010) Click here to to read the complete article. Sign up to receive Tricycle's Daily Dharma emails here. More »
  • Buddhism, Money, and the Recession: Where to Invest? Paid Member

    I recently came across an interview on the BBC website in which  Tibetan-Buddhist nun Lama Zangmo, living in London, speaks about the virtues of having no material possessions: More »