Politics

  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Is there an ethical way to visit Burma? Paid Member

    There has been plenty of discussion about the ethics of traveling to Burma, although its repressive government has been impervious to just about any kind of pressure the outside world applies. While there are Buddhist practitioners who visit monasteries to practice on extended retreats, most other travel has been frowned upon by many activists. But today's Washington Post lists a few tour agencies that "are mindful of the ongoing ethical debate about visiting Burma and have taken measures to ensure that at least some of their tourist dollars go to support small, locally owned businesses and not the repressive military dictatorship." More »
  • The Just War: Do the Buddhist teachings ever allow for violence? Paid Member

    A lively discussion followed a recent post here on the Army's first Buddhist chaplain. The latest response comes from John Scorsine, a military officer in the National Guard and a newly ordained Buddhist minister, who writes, "This question of the reconciliation of Buddhism and being a professional at arms has been a defining matter of inquiry for me." Scorsine continues, describing his discussion of this issue with the Dalai Lama: When I asked HHDL what in his view was the karmic consequence for killing for one’s country or for being killed in battle he responed: “And over here, liturgically speaking, most important is motivation and goal. Now goal to serve interest for larger community and motivation – compassionate motivation. Genuine sense of care. And then, if the circumstances, there’s no other way, only the violent way, then violence is permissible. More »
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    Sit down, rise up! Paid Member

    Ethan Nicthern's One City: A Declaration of Independence will give you a pretty good idea of what his work is all about. Committed to creating a "bridge" between contemplative practice and activism, Nichtern and his organization, the Interdependence Project, have evolved since the book appeared. We've seen the launch of Beliefnet's One City blog and  the growth and increasing visibility of the ID Project, which has recently relaunched its website. More »
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    Dalai Lama arrives, says Taiwan trip is of a "nonpolitical nature" Paid Member

    The Dalai Lama arrived at the Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport late Sunday night to a mixed reception, according to the Taiwan News. His reception in the south, however, where he has much more support and where government opposition is strongest, was far more enthusiastic. According to the News: The Dalai Lama was warmly greeted at Zuoying Station by a huge crowd that had been waiting there long before he arrived. More »
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    Invitation to Dalai Lama puts Taiwanese president in a pickle Paid Member

    The Dalai Lama's impending visit to Taiwan puts President Ma Ying-jeou in a pickle. It seems the invitation extended to the Dalai Lama is owing—at least in part— to local politics: From the New York Times: The invitation to the Dalai Lama, according to news reports, came from the leaders of seven southern cities who belong to the opposition Democratic Progressive Party, which promotes formal independence and has its traditional base of support in the south. Analysts saw the move as lose-lose for Mr. Ma and win-win for the opposition. George Tsai, a political analyst and professor at Chinese Culture University in Taipei, said Thursday that the invitation was “purely politically motivated, aiming to harass both Ma and China.” More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Richard Eskow: Ted Kennedy—through Allen Ginsberg's Eyes Paid Member

    This, sent to us by friend, Tricycle contributor and Huffington Post blogger Richard Eskow: I didn’t write or talk much about the death of Ted Kennedy (Sen. Bodhisattva, D-MA) for a couple of days. I didn’t even watch any TV coverage. When I finally did watch the testimonials, I remembered seeing Allen Ginsberg on the Tonight Show many years ago. It was either in early 1969—before Chappaquiddick—or a couple of years after that incident, when Ted Kennedy was once again being discussed as a Presidential contender. Johnny Carson asked Allen what he thought of Ted. He clearly thought that the grubby beatnik/hippie sitting before him would go on a tirade about rich suit-and-tie wearing squares and their bummer/ego/death trips and bringdown wars, or words to that effect. More »