Politics

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Buddha Buzz: Buddhist News from Around the World, Week of July 30 Paid Member

    Guess who's Buddhist now? Bill Clinton. Everybody's favorite proponent of the fourth precept ("I did not have sexual relations with that woman") is apparently learning how to meditate with the help of a Buddhist monk. I know, the article doesn't look too reliable. But still, it wouldn't surprise me if Bill were the latest public figure to jump on the Buddh"ish" bandwagon. The other Clinton has also been involved in Buddhist affairs this week. Here she is at the Shwedegon Pagoda in Burma, looking very happy indeed. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: All the Usual Characters Plus a Pack of Monkeys Paid Member

    The great Buddhist leaders of the world have been busy lately. On Saturday, Aung San Suu Kyi made her way to Oslo, where she accepted the Nobel Peace Prize awarded to her in 1991. (At the time, her sons accepted it on her behalf, as she was under house arrest by the Burmese military junta.) Her triumphant five-country European tour, still ongoing, is the first time she has left Burma in almost a quarter of a century. You can watch her moving acceptance speech here.  More »
  • Hunger Strikers for Tibet Paid Member

    Since the 1950 Chinese invasion that ended with the forced integration of Tibet into the People’s Republic of China, Tibet has been simmering. It has boiled over more than once, most notably for the first time in 1959, when uprisings swept through the Tibetan plateau and the current Dalai Lama fled to exile in India, as well as in 2008, when the unrest spread to the Tibetan diaspora. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Never Before and Always Paid Member

    The current issue of Tricycle features an interview with author, entrepreneur, and activist Paul Hawken that explores the increase in civil-society activism that has occurred internationally in the past year. As a follow-up to the interview, Paul wrote this guest blog post, which looks at the deep and concrete implications of financial issues that often appear to non-specialists as impenetrably abstract. The interview, "Upsurge: How Paul Hawken Anticipated Occupy Wall Street and the Rise of Leaderless Movements," can be found here.   More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Mindfulness and Being a Buddhist Woman Paid Member

    As mindfulness has spread into the corporate world, there have been some who have expressed their reservations about it. Is mindfulness being appropriated to serve ends of corporate greed? Is it promoting good business ethics or, as some suspect, merely teaching people to concentrate better on making money? If we take this article—"Corporate Buddhism Training Helps Employees Understand that Job Dissatisfaction and Malaise Are Actually Nirvana"—the answers to these questions are a very frightening yes. From the article: More »
  • Tricycle Talk: Congressman Tim Ryan stumps for mindfulness in Washington, DC and beyond Paid Member

    The 2012 Presidential election is the most fractious in memory—just another example of the partisan rancor ruling national politics today. (“Washington is broken,” stated Republican senator Olympia Snowe of Maine, a noted moderate, as she announced her decision not to run for a fourth term.) Contributing to the problem, insiders suggest, is that bipartisan socializing—a Washington tradition—has all but ceased, as pols spend their free time drumming up support back in their home districts. But if Congressman Tim Ryan, a five-term Democrat from Ohio, has anything to say about it, cultivating mindfulness not only can help us reconnect with our kindness and compassion individually and collectively but also could trickle up and help Congress reconnect, leading to more cooperation at the top. More »