Politics

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Buddha Buzz: Buddhist News from Around the World, Week of August 13 Paid Member

    Happy Belated Independence Day to India! The birthplace of Buddhism celebrated its 66th anniversary of independence on Wednesday. In another celebration, the San Francisco Zen Center, one of the largest sanghas in the United States, turned 50 on Monday, granting us the once in a lifetime opportunity to see a Shakyamuni Buddha bobblehead traversing the streets of San Francisco: More »
  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Bodhisattva Work Paid Member

    The Buddhist Peace Fellowship (BPF) was founded by Robert Aitken Roshi, his wife Anne, and Nelson Foster on the back porch of Aitken Roshi's Maui Zendo in 1978. The idea was to further interdependent practice of awakening and social justice, and BPF promotes these ideals to this day. Over the course of time, as BPF grew and established chapters all over the United States, it found the need for a newsletter as a means of communicating between the national office and the BPF chapters. This was the humble beginning of what came to be known as Turning Wheel magazine, what is now known as Turning Wheel Media. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Buddha Buzz: Buddhist News from Around the World, Week of July 30 Paid Member

    Guess who's Buddhist now? Bill Clinton. Everybody's favorite proponent of the fourth precept ("I did not have sexual relations with that woman") is apparently learning how to meditate with the help of a Buddhist monk. I know, the article doesn't look too reliable. But still, it wouldn't surprise me if Bill were the latest public figure to jump on the Buddh"ish" bandwagon. The other Clinton has also been involved in Buddhist affairs this week. Here she is at the Shwedegon Pagoda in Burma, looking very happy indeed. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: All the Usual Characters Plus a Pack of Monkeys Paid Member

    The great Buddhist leaders of the world have been busy lately. On Saturday, Aung San Suu Kyi made her way to Oslo, where she accepted the Nobel Peace Prize awarded to her in 1991. (At the time, her sons accepted it on her behalf, as she was under house arrest by the Burmese military junta.) Her triumphant five-country European tour, still ongoing, is the first time she has left Burma in almost a quarter of a century. You can watch her moving acceptance speech here.  More »
  • Hunger Strikers for Tibet Paid Member

    Since the 1950 Chinese invasion that ended with the forced integration of Tibet into the People’s Republic of China, Tibet has been simmering. It has boiled over more than once, most notably for the first time in 1959, when uprisings swept through the Tibetan plateau and the current Dalai Lama fled to exile in India, as well as in 2008, when the unrest spread to the Tibetan diaspora. More »
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    Never Before and Always Paid Member

    The current issue of Tricycle features an interview with author, entrepreneur, and activist Paul Hawken that explores the increase in civil-society activism that has occurred internationally in the past year. As a follow-up to the interview, Paul wrote this guest blog post, which looks at the deep and concrete implications of financial issues that often appear to non-specialists as impenetrably abstract. The interview, "Upsurge: How Paul Hawken Anticipated Occupy Wall Street and the Rise of Leaderless Movements," can be found here.   More »